Citation

Styling Equality: Black Beauty Parlors as Public and Private Spaces for Women, 1920-1980

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Abstract:

This paper is a survey of the past writings of women’s beauty culture. During the Depression, many women were forced out of their jobs, yet still had to support their family. Since the wages of blacks was significantly lower than those of white Americans, it was common for men and women to work outside the home. It was during this time that women began to open beauty parlors and salons. Most white salons discriminated against styling black women’s hair, and beauty schools of the time did not require courses on styling their different textured hair. Hair styling was frequently done in the private homes of black women, so it was a natural skill they brought with them when they opened beauty parlors.
At the dawn of the Civil Rights movement, these business owners mobilized support for equal rights for black women, The beauty parlors served as a private space where women could share local gossip and other beauty tips, and at the same time was a place of activism and organization. Women beauty shop owners had the capital to support equal rights organizations, and were public enough to garner support from a large group of women in the community. In this way, the black beauty parlor represented both public and private space in the lives of black women from 1920 to 1980.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

black (138), women (120), beauti (82), busi (57), hair (49), salon (39), parlor (34), white (26), boyd (22), provid (20), public (20), servic (20), care (19), also (19), walker (18), gill (18), note (17), communiti (16), place (16), style (14), industri (14),
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521785_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Braunscheidel, Anna. "Styling Equality: Black Beauty Parlors as Public and Private Spaces for Women, 1920-1980" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, Oct 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521785_index.html>

APA Citation:

Braunscheidel, A. , 2011-10-04 "Styling Equality: Black Beauty Parlors as Public and Private Spaces for Women, 1920-1980" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA Online <PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521785_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is a survey of the past writings of women’s beauty culture. During the Depression, many women were forced out of their jobs, yet still had to support their family. Since the wages of blacks was significantly lower than those of white Americans, it was common for men and women to work outside the home. It was during this time that women began to open beauty parlors and salons. Most white salons discriminated against styling black women’s hair, and beauty schools of the time did not require courses on styling their different textured hair. Hair styling was frequently done in the private homes of black women, so it was a natural skill they brought with them when they opened beauty parlors.
At the dawn of the Civil Rights movement, these business owners mobilized support for equal rights for black women, The beauty parlors served as a private space where women could share local gossip and other beauty tips, and at the same time was a place of activism and organization. Women beauty shop owners had the capital to support equal rights organizations, and were public enough to garner support from a large group of women in the community. In this way, the black beauty parlor represented both public and private space in the lives of black women from 1920 to 1980.


Similar Titles:
Taking Care of Business: The Relationship Between Self-care and Homecare Dependency Among Elderly Black Women

Jet Beauty of the Week: Black Publications and the Reconstruction of the Beauty Ideal for African American Women


 
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