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Hollis F. Price and Student Protest, 1958-1968

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Abstract:

Hollis F. Price (1904-1982) was a distinguished African-American educator and civic leader in Memphis during the 1950s and ’60s. He served as president of LeMoyne College—now LeMoyne-Owen—from 1943, when he became the school’s first black president, until he retired in 1970. The last dozen years of his presidency were enlivened and complicated by a number of student protests.
In the spring of 1958 a LeMoyne senior named Marion Barry publicly attacked a member of the school’s board of trustees (a former mayor of Memphis) for patently racist remarks. Despite the headaches which Barry’s protest cost him, Price tacitly supported it.
Several years of student protests, starting in February 1960, were directed not against LeMoyne, but against the continued segregation of public facilities in Memphis—beginning, appropriately, with sit-ins at the public library. Here Price’s support of the students and their goals was clear, even public.
Finally, in November 1968, LeMoyne-Owen students took over the administration building to protest several college policies. Alarmingly, they were assisted in their occupation of the building by a number of young radical nonstudents, some of whom were armed. While granting some of the students’ demands, Price distinguished himself by negotiating at great length and preventing violence, police action, and bloodshed.
Throughout these years of student protest, Price proved himself a steady, moderate, cool-headed leader, who encouraged students to think for themselves and dealt skillfully with the practical consequences of their thinking.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521843_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Bagby, George. "Hollis F. Price and Student Protest, 1958-1968" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, Oct 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521843_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bagby, G. F. , 2011-10-04 "Hollis F. Price and Student Protest, 1958-1968" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521843_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hollis F. Price (1904-1982) was a distinguished African-American educator and civic leader in Memphis during the 1950s and ’60s. He served as president of LeMoyne College—now LeMoyne-Owen—from 1943, when he became the school’s first black president, until he retired in 1970. The last dozen years of his presidency were enlivened and complicated by a number of student protests.
In the spring of 1958 a LeMoyne senior named Marion Barry publicly attacked a member of the school’s board of trustees (a former mayor of Memphis) for patently racist remarks. Despite the headaches which Barry’s protest cost him, Price tacitly supported it.
Several years of student protests, starting in February 1960, were directed not against LeMoyne, but against the continued segregation of public facilities in Memphis—beginning, appropriately, with sit-ins at the public library. Here Price’s support of the students and their goals was clear, even public.
Finally, in November 1968, LeMoyne-Owen students took over the administration building to protest several college policies. Alarmingly, they were assisted in their occupation of the building by a number of young radical nonstudents, some of whom were armed. While granting some of the students’ demands, Price distinguished himself by negotiating at great length and preventing violence, police action, and bloodshed.
Throughout these years of student protest, Price proved himself a steady, moderate, cool-headed leader, who encouraged students to think for themselves and dealt skillfully with the practical consequences of their thinking.


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