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Destroying Structures, Building Communities: The Relationship between Black Power, Urban Rebellions, and Black Institution Building

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Abstract:

Between 1965 and 1968, 329 urban rebellions took place in 257 American cities, resulting in nearly 300 deaths, 60,000 arrests, and hundreds of millions of dollars in property loss. More than forty years after the National Guard marched from the ghettos, the rebellions remain significant in the collective memory of black Americans and the State. It is important that scholars register the impact the rebellions had not only in transforming the strategic vision of black liberation movements but also in altering the relationship between blacks and urban communities.

Using Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Omaha, Nebraska as case studies, I argue that the these uprisings were the critical event fueling the shift from the Civil Rights to the Black Power movement and the subsequent conservative backlash. I demonstrate that these rebellions were more than a destructive political exercise but also a community building endeavor which achieved the following things: First, they assisted in more clearly codifying black nationalism in opposition to Euro-Americans and agents of the state. Second, these uprisings helped foster a stronger sense of community amongst black Americans, where their race identities became more salient than their class identities. Finally, grievances expressed in the aftermath of the rebellions helped to create new institutions and organizations within the community. This methodological revision will move the understanding of these disturbances from pathological and aberrant acts of violence to that of historically contingent acts of resistance that help highlight the coeval nature of organized protest, violent outbursts, and community building.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521889_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Howard, Ashley. "Destroying Structures, Building Communities: The Relationship between Black Power, Urban Rebellions, and Black Institution Building" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, Oct 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521889_index.html>

APA Citation:

Howard, A. M. , 2011-10-04 "Destroying Structures, Building Communities: The Relationship between Black Power, Urban Rebellions, and Black Institution Building" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521889_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Between 1965 and 1968, 329 urban rebellions took place in 257 American cities, resulting in nearly 300 deaths, 60,000 arrests, and hundreds of millions of dollars in property loss. More than forty years after the National Guard marched from the ghettos, the rebellions remain significant in the collective memory of black Americans and the State. It is important that scholars register the impact the rebellions had not only in transforming the strategic vision of black liberation movements but also in altering the relationship between blacks and urban communities.

Using Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Omaha, Nebraska as case studies, I argue that the these uprisings were the critical event fueling the shift from the Civil Rights to the Black Power movement and the subsequent conservative backlash. I demonstrate that these rebellions were more than a destructive political exercise but also a community building endeavor which achieved the following things: First, they assisted in more clearly codifying black nationalism in opposition to Euro-Americans and agents of the state. Second, these uprisings helped foster a stronger sense of community amongst black Americans, where their race identities became more salient than their class identities. Finally, grievances expressed in the aftermath of the rebellions helped to create new institutions and organizations within the community. This methodological revision will move the understanding of these disturbances from pathological and aberrant acts of violence to that of historically contingent acts of resistance that help highlight the coeval nature of organized protest, violent outbursts, and community building.


Similar Titles:
"Community Building: the 1967 Rebellion, the League of Revolutionary Black Workers, and Detroit's Building Trades, 1967-1973."

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