Citation

A Glimmer of Hope: Emancipation Day Celebrations in Raleigh, North Carolina, 1870-1898

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

As race relations were continuing to deteriorate in North Carolina after the end of slavery, some blacks and whites believed public demonstrations would help ease racial tensions. Charles Hunter, an African American educator, aided in the coordination of Fourth of July and Emancipation Day celebrations. When African Americans were not permitted to celebrate the Fourth of July due to growing white nationalism, African Americans began to celebrate the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1st of every year. Emancipation Day celebrations were used to bring whites and blacks together for a day of remembrance, as well as being used as a form of group therapy for blacks. The celebration granted blacks the opportunity to voice their grievances against racial prejudice. Hunter used the celebration to give a forum to white and black officials. Considering that more whites were embracing the ideals of social Darwinism, it was important for Hunter to encourage blacks to obtain an education and be more industrious to gain white approval. By constructing black history, Hunter attempted to convince whites that blacks were worthy of their rights. The Wilmington Race Riot was a turning point in the Emancipation Day Celebration. It symbolized the end of the Fusion Era in North Carolina and the continued deterioration of race relations. This research is based upon close readings of various local and national newspapers, the manuscript of Charles Hunter at Duke University, and various secondary sources to reveal the centrality of Emancipation Day celebrations in Raleigh, North Carolina.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521951_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Dunn, Adrienne. "A Glimmer of Hope: Emancipation Day Celebrations in Raleigh, North Carolina, 1870-1898" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521951_index.html>

APA Citation:

Dunn, A. P. "A Glimmer of Hope: Emancipation Day Celebrations in Raleigh, North Carolina, 1870-1898" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521951_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: As race relations were continuing to deteriorate in North Carolina after the end of slavery, some blacks and whites believed public demonstrations would help ease racial tensions. Charles Hunter, an African American educator, aided in the coordination of Fourth of July and Emancipation Day celebrations. When African Americans were not permitted to celebrate the Fourth of July due to growing white nationalism, African Americans began to celebrate the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1st of every year. Emancipation Day celebrations were used to bring whites and blacks together for a day of remembrance, as well as being used as a form of group therapy for blacks. The celebration granted blacks the opportunity to voice their grievances against racial prejudice. Hunter used the celebration to give a forum to white and black officials. Considering that more whites were embracing the ideals of social Darwinism, it was important for Hunter to encourage blacks to obtain an education and be more industrious to gain white approval. By constructing black history, Hunter attempted to convince whites that blacks were worthy of their rights. The Wilmington Race Riot was a turning point in the Emancipation Day Celebration. It symbolized the end of the Fusion Era in North Carolina and the continued deterioration of race relations. This research is based upon close readings of various local and national newspapers, the manuscript of Charles Hunter at Duke University, and various secondary sources to reveal the centrality of Emancipation Day celebrations in Raleigh, North Carolina.


Similar Titles:
The North Carolina Racial Justice Act Study: Preliminary Findings on the Role of Race in the North Carolina Capital Punishment System

North Carolina's Forgotten Past: Indian Woods, North Carolina and the Merging of Indian, Black and White Peoples From 1584 to Present

North Carolina's Dark Past with Eugenics: An Example of Black Women's Fight for Citizenship After Emancipation

Redefining Their Place: Black Business Elites in Post Emancipation Durham, North Carolina


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.