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Re-Framing the Storm: Documentary Film and the Legacy of Hurricane Katrina

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Abstract:

Popular memory recalls that New Orleans suffered a direct hit from a Category 5 hurricane on August 29, 2005; it did not. Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in American history, made landfall as a Category 3 to the city’s southeast. The memory remains because the storm surges and winds devastated New Orleans and its peoples. The levee system, designed to protect New Orleans from hurricane damage that had been allowed to fall into disrepair, breeched in multiple locations and left 80% of the city flooded. To this day death reports remain incomplete with 1,836 people listed as dead and hundreds of others listed as missing. For weeks afterwards the world saw images of the flooded Ninth Ward, human suffering at the Superdome and Convention Center, and military presence in an American city. Disaster myths, the belief that “disasters are accompanied by looting, social disorganization, and deviant behaviors,” characterized much of this coverage.
For years after the storm documentary filmmakers recast Katrina’s story by reexamining the experience of those who chose to ride the storm out in New Orleans and those who returned home to rebuild their city. This study examines the ways that documentary filmmakers sought to overturn disaster myths about the people of New Orleans. Using Spike Lee’s When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts and If God is Willing and the Creek Don’t Rise, Academy Award nominated Trouble the Water, Refuge of Last Resort, and The Storm. Special attention will be directed at the role of documentary filmmakers in recasting the narrative about black men from the original news coverage.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521982_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Fields, Andrea. "Re-Framing the Storm: Documentary Film and the Legacy of Hurricane Katrina" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521982_index.html>

APA Citation:

Fields, A. "Re-Framing the Storm: Documentary Film and the Legacy of Hurricane Katrina" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521982_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Popular memory recalls that New Orleans suffered a direct hit from a Category 5 hurricane on August 29, 2005; it did not. Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in American history, made landfall as a Category 3 to the city’s southeast. The memory remains because the storm surges and winds devastated New Orleans and its peoples. The levee system, designed to protect New Orleans from hurricane damage that had been allowed to fall into disrepair, breeched in multiple locations and left 80% of the city flooded. To this day death reports remain incomplete with 1,836 people listed as dead and hundreds of others listed as missing. For weeks afterwards the world saw images of the flooded Ninth Ward, human suffering at the Superdome and Convention Center, and military presence in an American city. Disaster myths, the belief that “disasters are accompanied by looting, social disorganization, and deviant behaviors,” characterized much of this coverage.
For years after the storm documentary filmmakers recast Katrina’s story by reexamining the experience of those who chose to ride the storm out in New Orleans and those who returned home to rebuild their city. This study examines the ways that documentary filmmakers sought to overturn disaster myths about the people of New Orleans. Using Spike Lee’s When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts and If God is Willing and the Creek Don’t Rise, Academy Award nominated Trouble the Water, Refuge of Last Resort, and The Storm. Special attention will be directed at the role of documentary filmmakers in recasting the narrative about black men from the original news coverage.


Similar Titles:
The Frame Game: Causal Stories, Attribution of Blame, and Preferences for Policy in Response to Hurricane Katrina

U.S Media Coverage of Natural Disasters: A Framing Analysis of Hurricane Katrina and the Tsunami

“Help Can’t Come Soon Enough”: Collective Memory, Accountability, and the Lasting Legacy of Hurricane Katrina

The fury of the storm: A framing analysis of the climate change discussion and Hurricane Katrina


 
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