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Frederick Douglass’ Aim for a True Civic Nation in a Post- Emancipated America

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Abstract:

As the United States rose from the ashes of the Civil War, civic activist Frederick Douglass continued to profess it was a time for United States to truly embrace the emancipation principles that had been so well acknowledged in the nation’s founding documents the Declaration of Independence and its Constitution. A Union victory in 1865, made it possible for four million ex-slaves to become freed with the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments added to the Constitution. Passing these series of amendments in Douglass’ opinion created a new ideal civic nation. Douglass stressed in the Post-Emancipation Era a clear civic nationalist vision that aspired to the idea that the United Sates now had a chance to become an all inclusive composite nation where blacks and whites could subscribed to one “common citizenship, equal rights and a common destiny…making every free slave free, and every man a voter.”
There was no other place where his civic vision rang clear for African Americans than through the pages of his new newspaper venture the New National Era, established in the nation’s capital Washington DC in 1870. “Frederick Douglass’ Aim for a True Civic Nation in a Post- Emancipated America” presentation/paper will explore Douglass’ civic aspirations for African Americans and their outcomes through the pages of the New National Era. As time progressed however it became evident that Douglass’ civic aims for four million ex-slaves presented an ominous revelation—their social and civic equality to be immersed in to the nation’s body politics amounted to a prolonged “dream deferred” as they made their transition from slavery to freedom.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522039_index.html
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MLA Citation:

McClarin, Ka'Mal. "Frederick Douglass’ Aim for a True Civic Nation in a Post- Emancipated America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522039_index.html>

APA Citation:

McClarin, K. "Frederick Douglass’ Aim for a True Civic Nation in a Post- Emancipated America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522039_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: As the United States rose from the ashes of the Civil War, civic activist Frederick Douglass continued to profess it was a time for United States to truly embrace the emancipation principles that had been so well acknowledged in the nation’s founding documents the Declaration of Independence and its Constitution. A Union victory in 1865, made it possible for four million ex-slaves to become freed with the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments added to the Constitution. Passing these series of amendments in Douglass’ opinion created a new ideal civic nation. Douglass stressed in the Post-Emancipation Era a clear civic nationalist vision that aspired to the idea that the United Sates now had a chance to become an all inclusive composite nation where blacks and whites could subscribed to one “common citizenship, equal rights and a common destiny…making every free slave free, and every man a voter.”
There was no other place where his civic vision rang clear for African Americans than through the pages of his new newspaper venture the New National Era, established in the nation’s capital Washington DC in 1870. “Frederick Douglass’ Aim for a True Civic Nation in a Post- Emancipated America” presentation/paper will explore Douglass’ civic aspirations for African Americans and their outcomes through the pages of the New National Era. As time progressed however it became evident that Douglass’ civic aims for four million ex-slaves presented an ominous revelation—their social and civic equality to be immersed in to the nation’s body politics amounted to a prolonged “dream deferred” as they made their transition from slavery to freedom.


Similar Titles:
Filling in the Blanks at Cedar Hill: History Education at Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, NPS

Reflections of A Country: Frederick Douglass' Washingtonian Reflections on Unfulfilled National Promises

Mobilizing a National Dialogue About The Issues Around Race Relations in “Post Racial America”

Emancipated But Not Free: The Post-Emancipation Apprenticeship System in Frederick County, Maryland, 1864-1870


 
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