Citation

St. Clair Drake, Pan-Africanism, African Studies, and the Politics of Knowledge, 1945-1963

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

From the late 1940s to the early 1960s, African American activist scholars navigated the turbulent waters between Cold War politics and African nationalism in diverse ways as they sought to balance personal, institutional, and political goals. Meanwhile, the United States government and several philanthropic foundations sought to create area studies programs to produce experts to help the United States execute its Cold War foreign policy. In Africa, this policy was designed to stop the spread of Soviet influence in the emerging independent states. Meanwhile, black scholars sought to capitalize on these developments to create African studies programs. At Roosevelt University, St. Clair Drake sought foundation funding for an African studies program, advocated immediate independence for African colonies, and actively fought the State Department when it sought to exclude Kenyan nationalists from travel or study in the United States. Like other black Africanist scholars, Drake faced enormous obstacles, including competition from programs headed by white scholars. Furthermore, Drake’s Pan-African ideology and his opposition to the United States’s Cold War-based backing of colonialist powers in Africa, doomed Drake’s hopes for foundation funding. By focusing on the career of St. Clair Drake, this paper complicates our understanding of the diverse ways that black scholars pursued educational, political, and personal goals, while confronting racial and political obstacles during the early Cold War era.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522048_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Gershenhorn, Jerry. "St. Clair Drake, Pan-Africanism, African Studies, and the Politics of Knowledge, 1945-1963" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522048_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gershenhorn, J. "St. Clair Drake, Pan-Africanism, African Studies, and the Politics of Knowledge, 1945-1963" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522048_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: From the late 1940s to the early 1960s, African American activist scholars navigated the turbulent waters between Cold War politics and African nationalism in diverse ways as they sought to balance personal, institutional, and political goals. Meanwhile, the United States government and several philanthropic foundations sought to create area studies programs to produce experts to help the United States execute its Cold War foreign policy. In Africa, this policy was designed to stop the spread of Soviet influence in the emerging independent states. Meanwhile, black scholars sought to capitalize on these developments to create African studies programs. At Roosevelt University, St. Clair Drake sought foundation funding for an African studies program, advocated immediate independence for African colonies, and actively fought the State Department when it sought to exclude Kenyan nationalists from travel or study in the United States. Like other black Africanist scholars, Drake faced enormous obstacles, including competition from programs headed by white scholars. Furthermore, Drake’s Pan-African ideology and his opposition to the United States’s Cold War-based backing of colonialist powers in Africa, doomed Drake’s hopes for foundation funding. By focusing on the career of St. Clair Drake, this paper complicates our understanding of the diverse ways that black scholars pursued educational, political, and personal goals, while confronting racial and political obstacles during the early Cold War era.


Similar Titles:
St. Clair Drake and African Studies: The Case of Chicago in the Cold War

Jim Crow Meets John Bull: St. Clair Drake and the Pan African Community in Great Britain, 1946-1948

“I Have Grown up in the Pan African Orbit”: St. Clair Drake, African Studies, and the Struggles of the Black Scholar-Activist, 1945-1960


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.