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Learning from Drake at Stanford: (Re)Mapping Diasporic Connections in the U.S., U.K. and Circum-Caribbean

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Abstract:

St. Clair Drake was an erudite scholar whose breadth of knowledge and publicly engaged scholarship blurred disciplinary boundaries and spanned global terrain. Although he is most readily known for the classic Black Metropolis (co-authored with Horace Cayton) and his advocacy scholarship in African Studies, Drake devoted the final phases of his career and life to developing a conceptual paradigm and programmatic framework for studying the African Diaspora. The result of this project is the two-volume, Black Folk Here and There: An Essay in History and Anthropology (1987, 1990). Another is the equally wide-ranging unpublished manuscript The Black Diaspora, which he was unable to complete before passing. This potential tour de force informed much of his teaching and mentoring at Stanford University, both before and after his official retirement in 1976. This paper reflects on Drake’s perspective on the Caribbean and Caribbean diaspora as integral sites for interrogating the legacies of race, power, and history in the wider African World. The paper will argue that Circum-Caribbean connections and migrations were an important concern for Drake, whose influence led some of his students, myself included, to become Caribbeanists—in the broadest conceptual and cartographical sense of the term.
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Name: 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522049_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Harrison, Faye. "Learning from Drake at Stanford: (Re)Mapping Diasporic Connections in the U.S., U.K. and Circum-Caribbean" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522049_index.html>

APA Citation:

Harrison, F. V. "Learning from Drake at Stanford: (Re)Mapping Diasporic Connections in the U.S., U.K. and Circum-Caribbean" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522049_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: St. Clair Drake was an erudite scholar whose breadth of knowledge and publicly engaged scholarship blurred disciplinary boundaries and spanned global terrain. Although he is most readily known for the classic Black Metropolis (co-authored with Horace Cayton) and his advocacy scholarship in African Studies, Drake devoted the final phases of his career and life to developing a conceptual paradigm and programmatic framework for studying the African Diaspora. The result of this project is the two-volume, Black Folk Here and There: An Essay in History and Anthropology (1987, 1990). Another is the equally wide-ranging unpublished manuscript The Black Diaspora, which he was unable to complete before passing. This potential tour de force informed much of his teaching and mentoring at Stanford University, both before and after his official retirement in 1976. This paper reflects on Drake’s perspective on the Caribbean and Caribbean diaspora as integral sites for interrogating the legacies of race, power, and history in the wider African World. The paper will argue that Circum-Caribbean connections and migrations were an important concern for Drake, whose influence led some of his students, myself included, to become Caribbeanists—in the broadest conceptual and cartographical sense of the term.


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