Citation

Symbols of Freedom: Emancipation Oak and Other Symbols

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Abstract:

At 4:30 a.m., April 12, 1861, Confederate troops fired upon Fort Sumter in South Carolina. This was the beginning of the bloodiest war on American soil. It would last more than four years and 625,000 Americans would lose their lives. Nearly 200,000 African Americans joined the Union Army--38,000 lost their lives.
The Civil War lasted from 1861 to 1865. Most scholars contend that the war was fought for two reasons: (1) Freedom; and (2) Abraham Lincoln’s effort to preserve the union. There are symbols associated with struggle for freedom. These include the Berlin Wall, Tiananmen Square, Robbins Island, and Fort Monroe, Virginia, a refuge for thousands of contraband during the Civil War.
Symbols motivate and inspire people. One of the most important symbols in our nation’s history is the Emancipation Oak, near the entrance to the campus of Hampton University. It is a lasting symbol of struggle, heritage and perseverance. It was under this oak tree that the first reading of the Emancipation Proclamation in the South took place on January 1, 1863. That was the day of “jubilee” for more than 600,000 African Americans in Virginia at the time of the Civil War. The Emancipation Oak served as the first classroom on the Virginia Peninsula for newly freed black men and women.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522105_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Watson, Robert. "Symbols of Freedom: Emancipation Oak and Other Symbols" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, Oct 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522105_index.html>

APA Citation:

Watson, R. C. , 2011-10-04 "Symbols of Freedom: Emancipation Oak and Other Symbols" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522105_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: At 4:30 a.m., April 12, 1861, Confederate troops fired upon Fort Sumter in South Carolina. This was the beginning of the bloodiest war on American soil. It would last more than four years and 625,000 Americans would lose their lives. Nearly 200,000 African Americans joined the Union Army--38,000 lost their lives.
The Civil War lasted from 1861 to 1865. Most scholars contend that the war was fought for two reasons: (1) Freedom; and (2) Abraham Lincoln’s effort to preserve the union. There are symbols associated with struggle for freedom. These include the Berlin Wall, Tiananmen Square, Robbins Island, and Fort Monroe, Virginia, a refuge for thousands of contraband during the Civil War.
Symbols motivate and inspire people. One of the most important symbols in our nation’s history is the Emancipation Oak, near the entrance to the campus of Hampton University. It is a lasting symbol of struggle, heritage and perseverance. It was under this oak tree that the first reading of the Emancipation Proclamation in the South took place on January 1, 1863. That was the day of “jubilee” for more than 600,000 African Americans in Virginia at the time of the Civil War. The Emancipation Oak served as the first classroom on the Virginia Peninsula for newly freed black men and women.


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“Freedom without Equality: Emancipation in the United States, 1861-1865”

Comparing Our Freedoms: Emancipation in Canada and the United States

Reinterpretations of Black Emancipation, Freedom, and Equality


 
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