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Race, Gender, and Class: In the Aftermath of the Great Okeechobee Hurricane and Flood in Florida, 16-17 September 1928

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Abstract:

Like the response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the response to the Great Okeechobee Hurricane and Flood in Florida, 16-17 September 1928 exposed the rampant benign racism at the heart of United States' society in the midst of weather disastrous. Similar to Katrina, the 1928 Florida disaster was both a hurricane and a flood; and like Katrina, most of the people who died in south Florida did not die from the hurricane itself; instead, most of the people were killed when the storm surge from Lake Okeechobee breached the dike surrounding the lake, flooding an area covering hundreds of square miles. Even though it is the second-deadliest natural disaster in United States history behind the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the hurricane is often called the “Forgotten Hurricane.” Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God immortalized the hurricane. Similar to Katrina, in 1928 race, class, and gender were significant factors in the aftermath of the hurricane and flood. Three black women Mary Church Terrell, Mary McLeod Bethune and Grace P. Campbell took various positions on the recovery process that at times were similar in nature, and at other times were at variance. In 1927, all three as these women were recognized as outstanding who had made racial progress possible in the nation. One of the effects of the 1928 Storm was that it highlighted the tensions between the political left and right who were engage in racial politics. The intent of this paper is to capture, as well as highlight the black voices, actors, and issues in the aftermath weather disaster.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522117_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lindsey, Lydia. "Race, Gender, and Class: In the Aftermath of the Great Okeechobee Hurricane and Flood in Florida, 16-17 September 1928" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, Oct 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522117_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lindsey, L. , 2011-10-04 "Race, Gender, and Class: In the Aftermath of the Great Okeechobee Hurricane and Flood in Florida, 16-17 September 1928" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522117_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Like the response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the response to the Great Okeechobee Hurricane and Flood in Florida, 16-17 September 1928 exposed the rampant benign racism at the heart of United States' society in the midst of weather disastrous. Similar to Katrina, the 1928 Florida disaster was both a hurricane and a flood; and like Katrina, most of the people who died in south Florida did not die from the hurricane itself; instead, most of the people were killed when the storm surge from Lake Okeechobee breached the dike surrounding the lake, flooding an area covering hundreds of square miles. Even though it is the second-deadliest natural disaster in United States history behind the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the hurricane is often called the “Forgotten Hurricane.” Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God immortalized the hurricane. Similar to Katrina, in 1928 race, class, and gender were significant factors in the aftermath of the hurricane and flood. Three black women Mary Church Terrell, Mary McLeod Bethune and Grace P. Campbell took various positions on the recovery process that at times were similar in nature, and at other times were at variance. In 1927, all three as these women were recognized as outstanding who had made racial progress possible in the nation. One of the effects of the 1928 Storm was that it highlighted the tensions between the political left and right who were engage in racial politics. The intent of this paper is to capture, as well as highlight the black voices, actors, and issues in the aftermath weather disaster.


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