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Soldiering, Citizenship, and Partisanship: Black Military Service and Postwar Political Participation in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1865-1877

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Abstract:

"Once let the black man get upon his person the brass letter, U.S., let him get an eagle on his button, and a musket on his shoulder and bullets in his pocket, there is no power on earth that can deny that he has earned the right to citizenship." (Frederick Douglass)

Black military service during the Civil War was pivotal to black political participation in Wilmington, North Carolina after Emancipation. The presence of black troops within the city symbolized the dramatic reversal that had just occurred. The city’s blacks saw black troops as a symbol of their new freedom and looked to them for protection and security in the face of postwar white terrorism. Militaristic associations, like The Grand Army of the Republic, fostered early political organizing among black Wilmingtonians and of the black men who would go on to hold public office in the city after the passage of the Reconstruction Acts in 1867, many had served in the military during the war. However, black military service in the Union army did not ensure lack loyalty to the Republican party even among soldiers and veterans themselves. Wilmington politics were complex and factionalism existed in both the Republican party and the black communities. Faced with Republican exclusion, black Wilmingtonians formed alternative political parties forged in slavery, war, and emancipation and rooted in the city’s black neighborhoods. Black soldiers and veterans figured prominently in these alternative political parties. This paper explores the relationship between black military service and postwar partisanship in Wilmington after the Civil War.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522332_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Jackson, Thanayi. "Soldiering, Citizenship, and Partisanship: Black Military Service and Postwar Political Participation in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1865-1877" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, Oct 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522332_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jackson, T. , 2011-10-04 "Soldiering, Citizenship, and Partisanship: Black Military Service and Postwar Political Participation in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1865-1877" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522332_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: "Once let the black man get upon his person the brass letter, U.S., let him get an eagle on his button, and a musket on his shoulder and bullets in his pocket, there is no power on earth that can deny that he has earned the right to citizenship." (Frederick Douglass)

Black military service during the Civil War was pivotal to black political participation in Wilmington, North Carolina after Emancipation. The presence of black troops within the city symbolized the dramatic reversal that had just occurred. The city’s blacks saw black troops as a symbol of their new freedom and looked to them for protection and security in the face of postwar white terrorism. Militaristic associations, like The Grand Army of the Republic, fostered early political organizing among black Wilmingtonians and of the black men who would go on to hold public office in the city after the passage of the Reconstruction Acts in 1867, many had served in the military during the war. However, black military service in the Union army did not ensure lack loyalty to the Republican party even among soldiers and veterans themselves. Wilmington politics were complex and factionalism existed in both the Republican party and the black communities. Faced with Republican exclusion, black Wilmingtonians formed alternative political parties forged in slavery, war, and emancipation and rooted in the city’s black neighborhoods. Black soldiers and veterans figured prominently in these alternative political parties. This paper explores the relationship between black military service and postwar partisanship in Wilmington after the Civil War.


Similar Titles:
The Political Culture of Reconstruction’s New Spaces: The Saloon and Alternative Partisanship in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1869-1870

“Black Wall Street, Black Politics, and the Long Black Freedom Struggle in Durham, North Carolina, 1930 to 1970”

Harvey Gantt vs Jesse Helms: The 1990 U.S. Senate Race on "Race" and the Fear of Black Dominance in North Carolina Politics

Defining Citizen/Defining Statesman: From the Reconstruction Acts to the Election of Black Men in Wilmington, North Carolina


 
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