Citation

Fighting for Freedom in The Cradle of Liberty: The Civil Rights Movement in Boston, 1934-1968

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Abstract:

As a symbol, Black Bostonians have always been emblematic of that distinctly American of dilemmas—the curious conundrum of what it means to be Black in “the cradle of liberty”. Boston was the first city in the country to integrate its public schools, yet Boston literally tore itself apart during the turbulent busing crisis of the 1970s. Perhaps for this reason and others, Boston's Civil Rights Movement between 1945 and 1968, the period before Boston’s infamous busing crisis, has not received nearly as much attention as the school desegregation period that led up to and reached a crescendo in 1974. Both popular and scholarly attention, where it has been paid, has focused on the busing crisis of the 1970s, ignoring Boston's Civil Rights activities in the post-war period that paved the way for the educational equality movement to come, and focused mainly on issues of employment, housing, educational equality and quality of life. The issues engaged by Boston's freedom movement, from de facto school segregation, housing and employment challenge many prevailing popular assumptions about postwar black freedom struggles in other cities. Issues such as the relatively small size of Boston’s black population, the national attention drawn by the busing crisis and the legacy of immigration and class also problematize this discussion. The civil rights movement in Boston touched upon every aspect of African-American life and shaped the future of the city. This project aims to investigate the origins of that movement and what gave rise to the unique nature of civil rights organizing activities in Boston before the Busing period. By looking at the political context leading up to these events beginning in the 1930s, I will attempt to reconstruct the early efforts to end “Jane and Jim Crow” employment with the “Don’t Buy Where You Cant Work” campaigns, the role of African American student organizations at Boston area universities which drew a cadre of Black leadership to Boston, many of whom ended up staying and becoming part of the movement as well as the role of organizations such as the Freedom House and the Black church in Boston.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522423_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Miletsky, Zebulon. "Fighting for Freedom in The Cradle of Liberty: The Civil Rights Movement in Boston, 1934-1968" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522423_index.html>

APA Citation:

Miletsky, Z. V. "Fighting for Freedom in The Cradle of Liberty: The Civil Rights Movement in Boston, 1934-1968" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522423_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: As a symbol, Black Bostonians have always been emblematic of that distinctly American of dilemmas—the curious conundrum of what it means to be Black in “the cradle of liberty”. Boston was the first city in the country to integrate its public schools, yet Boston literally tore itself apart during the turbulent busing crisis of the 1970s. Perhaps for this reason and others, Boston's Civil Rights Movement between 1945 and 1968, the period before Boston’s infamous busing crisis, has not received nearly as much attention as the school desegregation period that led up to and reached a crescendo in 1974. Both popular and scholarly attention, where it has been paid, has focused on the busing crisis of the 1970s, ignoring Boston's Civil Rights activities in the post-war period that paved the way for the educational equality movement to come, and focused mainly on issues of employment, housing, educational equality and quality of life. The issues engaged by Boston's freedom movement, from de facto school segregation, housing and employment challenge many prevailing popular assumptions about postwar black freedom struggles in other cities. Issues such as the relatively small size of Boston’s black population, the national attention drawn by the busing crisis and the legacy of immigration and class also problematize this discussion. The civil rights movement in Boston touched upon every aspect of African-American life and shaped the future of the city. This project aims to investigate the origins of that movement and what gave rise to the unique nature of civil rights organizing activities in Boston before the Busing period. By looking at the political context leading up to these events beginning in the 1930s, I will attempt to reconstruct the early efforts to end “Jane and Jim Crow” employment with the “Don’t Buy Where You Cant Work” campaigns, the role of African American student organizations at Boston area universities which drew a cadre of Black leadership to Boston, many of whom ended up staying and becoming part of the movement as well as the role of organizations such as the Freedom House and the Black church in Boston.


Similar Titles:
The Congress of Racial Equality, A Jazz Salute to Freedom, and the Cultural Strategy of the Modern Civil Rights Movement

In Freedom's Birthplace: The Post-War Origins of Boston's Civil Rights Movement.

Before Busing: The Origins of Boston’s Civil Rights Movement

Freedom Rights: Reconceptualizing the Civil Rights Movement


 
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