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Recent High School Immigrants’ Program Placement and Their Academic Performance in Texas Schools: What Do We Know and What Do We Need to Know?

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Abstract:

The paper explores the relationship between program placement policies regarding the education of recently immigrated students and selected outcomes for these newcomers in urban high schools located in central Texas under the implementation of NCLB. More than one in five children in the United States has at least one immigrant parent. The number of children of immigrants has doubled after the last two decades (Capps, Fix, Murray, Ost, Passel, & Herwantoro, 2005; Hernandez, 2004). Secondary schools have experienced greater increases in immigrant youth populations than elementary or preschools. During the 1990s the number of children of immigrants grew more rapidly in secondary than elementary schools (72% versus 39%) (Capps et al. 2005; Hernandez, Denton, & Macartney, 2007; Landale & Oropesa, 1995). High school recent immigrant students with low-levels of English proficiency are often placed in either English as a Second Language (ESL) program or a newcomer school (Boyson &
Short, 2003).

Recognizing the struggles and challenges that foreign-born high school-age students who can speak little or no English face, this research explores the learning opportunities and educational achievement of high school newly arrived immigrant students enrolled in two different programs: newcomer schools and ESL programs. It also investigates how newcomers’ identification and promotion, which are based upon English language proficiency testing, affect recent immigrant students’ program placement and educational achievement. This study fills a glaring gap in newcomer program research, creates a model that can be replicated by researchers studying future research, and seeks to contribute to efforts of school administrators, policymakers and researchers as they work to develop better newcomer programs, make their preexisting programs more effective, and/or examine the outcomes of newcomer programs.
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Association:
Name: UCEA Annual Convention
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http://www.ucea.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p523213_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lee, Pei-Ling. "Recent High School Immigrants’ Program Placement and Their Academic Performance in Texas Schools: What Do We Know and What Do We Need to Know?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Westin Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p523213_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lee, P. "Recent High School Immigrants’ Program Placement and Their Academic Performance in Texas Schools: What Do We Know and What Do We Need to Know?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Westin Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p523213_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: The paper explores the relationship between program placement policies regarding the education of recently immigrated students and selected outcomes for these newcomers in urban high schools located in central Texas under the implementation of NCLB. More than one in five children in the United States has at least one immigrant parent. The number of children of immigrants has doubled after the last two decades (Capps, Fix, Murray, Ost, Passel, & Herwantoro, 2005; Hernandez, 2004). Secondary schools have experienced greater increases in immigrant youth populations than elementary or preschools. During the 1990s the number of children of immigrants grew more rapidly in secondary than elementary schools (72% versus 39%) (Capps et al. 2005; Hernandez, Denton, & Macartney, 2007; Landale & Oropesa, 1995). High school recent immigrant students with low-levels of English proficiency are often placed in either English as a Second Language (ESL) program or a newcomer school (Boyson &
Short, 2003).

Recognizing the struggles and challenges that foreign-born high school-age students who can speak little or no English face, this research explores the learning opportunities and educational achievement of high school newly arrived immigrant students enrolled in two different programs: newcomer schools and ESL programs. It also investigates how newcomers’ identification and promotion, which are based upon English language proficiency testing, affect recent immigrant students’ program placement and educational achievement. This study fills a glaring gap in newcomer program research, creates a model that can be replicated by researchers studying future research, and seeks to contribute to efforts of school administrators, policymakers and researchers as they work to develop better newcomer programs, make their preexisting programs more effective, and/or examine the outcomes of newcomer programs.


Similar Titles:
Quality Indicators for Innovative Programs: Improving the quality of school-university partnership and school-based teacher preparation programs in low-performing schools in Kansas, Nevada, Ohio and Texas

Being a "good student": The translation of Mexican immigrant students' previous academic experiences to a central Texas high school

Addressing the Academic Needs of LEP Newcomer Students in Middle School and High School


 
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