Citation

Fabula aut historia: Boccaccio's Gen. XIV, 9 and Petrarch's Sen. XVII, 3–4

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Abstract:

In early 1373 Boccaccio presented Petrarch with a copy of his Decameron, to which work Petrarch would later admit to have devoted only cursory attention. He nonetheless dwelt long on the Centonovelle’s very last tale, the story of Griselda, so that he finally decided to translate it into Latin. The reasons behind such a surprising choice are to be found in two of his Senili (XVII, 3-4), that form, together with the attached Latin Griselda, a prehumanist treatise entitled De insigni obedientia et fide uxoria. But Petrarch’s text is a radical rewriting of the source tale rather than a faithful translation, as it turns its fabula into an exemplum that the good Christian should follow in order to achieve moral perfection. Did Petrarch’s predilection for historical verisimilitude misunderstand and so distort Boccaccio’s concept of fabula? What idea did he entertain of the "Griselda fable," the very apex of Boccaccio’s masterpiece?

Author's Keywords:

Griselda, Boccaccio, Petrarca, women, education, translation
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Association:
Name: RSA Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.rsa.org


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MLA Citation:

Candido, Igor. "Fabula aut historia: Boccaccio's Gen. XIV, 9 and Petrarch's Sen. XVII, 3–4" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2014-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p525697_index.html>

APA Citation:

Candido, I. "Fabula aut historia: Boccaccio's Gen. XIV, 9 and Petrarch's Sen. XVII, 3–4" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2014-11-24 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p525697_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In early 1373 Boccaccio presented Petrarch with a copy of his Decameron, to which work Petrarch would later admit to have devoted only cursory attention. He nonetheless dwelt long on the Centonovelle’s very last tale, the story of Griselda, so that he finally decided to translate it into Latin. The reasons behind such a surprising choice are to be found in two of his Senili (XVII, 3-4), that form, together with the attached Latin Griselda, a prehumanist treatise entitled De insigni obedientia et fide uxoria. But Petrarch’s text is a radical rewriting of the source tale rather than a faithful translation, as it turns its fabula into an exemplum that the good Christian should follow in order to achieve moral perfection. Did Petrarch’s predilection for historical verisimilitude misunderstand and so distort Boccaccio’s concept of fabula? What idea did he entertain of the "Griselda fable," the very apex of Boccaccio’s masterpiece?


Similar Titles:
Historia, Fabula, and the Periodization of Veracity

Petrarch, Boccaccio, and the Rewriting of Griselda’s Tale: A Rhetorical Debate on Latin and Vernacular Language

Petrarch's Appropriation of Boccaccio: The Historia Griseldis


 
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