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A Dream Deferred: Benjamin E. Mays and the Struggle for School Desegregation

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Abstract:

For nearly 30 years of his professional career as an educator, Benjamin Elijah Mays, former president of Morehouse College, wrote and published numerous articles on the deleterious effects of segregation and the need for America to integrate its public institutions, especially schools. He believed firmly that the racial integration of public schools was not only necessary, but also inevitable. The 1954 Brown decision affirmed Mays’s view, but white southerners response via massive resistance and residential flight threatened significant racial integration in public schools. By the early 1970s, consequently, Mays’s optimism regarding the inevitability of racial integration in public schools had begun to wane. Following his election to the Atlanta School Board and subsequent appointment as board president, Mays experienced firsthand the challenge inherent in integrating schools and saw no solution to white’s fleeing the city for flourishing suburbs or enrolling their children in private schools. In the latter years of his career, Mays continued to support efforts to provide quality education for students of color, but he concluded that it was not necessary for blacks to attend school with whites to secure a quality education.
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Association:
Name: 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p528237_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Gaines, Robert. "A Dream Deferred: Benjamin E. Mays and the Struggle for School Desegregation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p528237_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gaines, R. W. "A Dream Deferred: Benjamin E. Mays and the Struggle for School Desegregation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p528237_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: For nearly 30 years of his professional career as an educator, Benjamin Elijah Mays, former president of Morehouse College, wrote and published numerous articles on the deleterious effects of segregation and the need for America to integrate its public institutions, especially schools. He believed firmly that the racial integration of public schools was not only necessary, but also inevitable. The 1954 Brown decision affirmed Mays’s view, but white southerners response via massive resistance and residential flight threatened significant racial integration in public schools. By the early 1970s, consequently, Mays’s optimism regarding the inevitability of racial integration in public schools had begun to wane. Following his election to the Atlanta School Board and subsequent appointment as board president, Mays experienced firsthand the challenge inherent in integrating schools and saw no solution to white’s fleeing the city for flourishing suburbs or enrolling their children in private schools. In the latter years of his career, Mays continued to support efforts to provide quality education for students of color, but he concluded that it was not necessary for blacks to attend school with whites to secure a quality education.


Similar Titles:
A Dream Still Deferred: The Fight for Educational Equality in the Columbus City School District

The Struggle for School Desegregation in Richmond, VA: Creating Documentary Theater

"Downstate is No Different than Dixie": The Struggle for School Desegregation in Cairo, Illinois, 1949-1954


 
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