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When cultural activities matter: A cross-national analysis of the effects of participation in high culture on academic achievement

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Abstract:

Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of cultural capital has been widely used to study social reproduction in France and many other national contexts. From the cultural capital perspective, socialization of children from high socioeconomic status (SES) families into highbrow culture is rewarded in the school system and later in the society in terms of better educational qualifications and jobs. The result is the reproduction of educational and social inequalities. These theoretical claims have been tested in various national contexts but evidence is mixed. For example, in the United States and Japan, research has shown some positive effects on academic achievement. In contrast, research in Greece and England, cultural activities were found to be insignificantly related to academic achievement. Furthermore, in South Korea, participation in highbrow culture has a negative effect on academic achievement. The question then rises as to educational conditions under which highbrow culture matters. In this study, I used data from 2000 PISA to identify institutional features of educational systems that shape the relationship between highbrow cultural participation and academic achievement, focusing on the roles of standardized curriculum, high-stakes testing, and shadow education. Results showed that high-stakes testing and shadow education reduced the extent to which students participate in highbrow culture and the effect of cultural participation on academic achievement. Additional results, implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed.
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Association:
Name: 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547964_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Byun, Soo-yong. "When cultural activities matter: A cross-national analysis of the effects of participation in high culture on academic achievement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547964_index.html>

APA Citation:

Byun, S. "When cultural activities matter: A cross-national analysis of the effects of participation in high culture on academic achievement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547964_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of cultural capital has been widely used to study social reproduction in France and many other national contexts. From the cultural capital perspective, socialization of children from high socioeconomic status (SES) families into highbrow culture is rewarded in the school system and later in the society in terms of better educational qualifications and jobs. The result is the reproduction of educational and social inequalities. These theoretical claims have been tested in various national contexts but evidence is mixed. For example, in the United States and Japan, research has shown some positive effects on academic achievement. In contrast, research in Greece and England, cultural activities were found to be insignificantly related to academic achievement. Furthermore, in South Korea, participation in highbrow culture has a negative effect on academic achievement. The question then rises as to educational conditions under which highbrow culture matters. In this study, I used data from 2000 PISA to identify institutional features of educational systems that shape the relationship between highbrow cultural participation and academic achievement, focusing on the roles of standardized curriculum, high-stakes testing, and shadow education. Results showed that high-stakes testing and shadow education reduced the extent to which students participate in highbrow culture and the effect of cultural participation on academic achievement. Additional results, implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed.


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Cross-national variation in the effect of instructional practices on classroom achievement: The moderating effect of curriculum policy and national culture


 
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