Citation

Determining Dry Matter Intake of Annual and Perennial Cool-Season Grasses Harvested as High Moisture Hay and Fed to Lambs

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Abstract:

Over 6 million acres of winter wheat are planted in Oklahoma annually. Although low- and no-till production practices reduce the amount of fossil fuel imputs required to establish a wheat crop, as an annual crop fossil fuel investment must be made each year. Wheat is a multiple purpose crop that can be grazed by sheep or cattle in the fall and winter, harvested for grain in early summer or grazed or cut for hay. Multiple use crops are an important economic tool that increases agricultural enterprise diversity, lowers economicrisk and adds stability to the economy of rural communities. Perennial cool- season grasses do not have to be established each year and can be used just like winter wheat to support grazing livestock in the fall and grazed or cut of hay in early summer. Perennial cool- season grasses can be established on erodible land to reduce soil erosion and used to replace some wheat acreages to decrease fossil fuel inputs. However, in animal performance trials at the USDA- ARS Grazing laboratory in El Reno, OK perennial cool-season grasses were not able to provide as much daily body weight gain as winter wheat. Possible reasons for the differences in daily gain between winter wheat and perennial cool-season grasses may be due to differences in digestibility and/or feed intake. To answer this question, and experiment was coducted to measure differences in forage intake between winter wheat and a perrennial cool-season grass (Triticulm aestivum Var. Pioneer 2174 and Festuca arundianaceace) harvested at the same stage of maturity in the spring and fed as high moisture hay.
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Association:
Name: Oklahoma Research Day
URL:
http://www.cameron.edu/okresearchday


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p549418_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Tuthill, Cameron. and Phillips, William. "Determining Dry Matter Intake of Annual and Perennial Cool-Season Grasses Harvested as High Moisture Hay and Fed to Lambs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p549418_index.html>

APA Citation:

Tuthill, C. K. and Phillips, W. A. , 2011-11-04 "Determining Dry Matter Intake of Annual and Perennial Cool-Season Grasses Harvested as High Moisture Hay and Fed to Lambs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p549418_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over 6 million acres of winter wheat are planted in Oklahoma annually. Although low- and no-till production practices reduce the amount of fossil fuel imputs required to establish a wheat crop, as an annual crop fossil fuel investment must be made each year. Wheat is a multiple purpose crop that can be grazed by sheep or cattle in the fall and winter, harvested for grain in early summer or grazed or cut for hay. Multiple use crops are an important economic tool that increases agricultural enterprise diversity, lowers economicrisk and adds stability to the economy of rural communities. Perennial cool- season grasses do not have to be established each year and can be used just like winter wheat to support grazing livestock in the fall and grazed or cut of hay in early summer. Perennial cool- season grasses can be established on erodible land to reduce soil erosion and used to replace some wheat acreages to decrease fossil fuel inputs. However, in animal performance trials at the USDA- ARS Grazing laboratory in El Reno, OK perennial cool-season grasses were not able to provide as much daily body weight gain as winter wheat. Possible reasons for the differences in daily gain between winter wheat and perennial cool-season grasses may be due to differences in digestibility and/or feed intake. To answer this question, and experiment was coducted to measure differences in forage intake between winter wheat and a perrennial cool-season grass (Triticulm aestivum Var. Pioneer 2174 and Festuca arundianaceace) harvested at the same stage of maturity in the spring and fed as high moisture hay.


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Determining Dry Matter Intake of Annual and Perennial Cool-season Grasses Harvested as High Moisture Hay and Fed to Lambs


 
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