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Private company managers and employees and third sector organization members interacting: solid waste as a theme and a problem

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Abstract:

Private company managers and employees and third sector organization members interacting: solid waste as a theme and a problem

Shrivastava (1995) propose, in a functionalist and prescriptive way that the responsibility to solve problems related to climate change should be divided into three parts: government, consumers and companies. Governmental actions have their limits, as do the actions of individual consumers, requiring companies to also engage voluntarily in actions. These actions are increasingly taking place along with third sector organizations, with the aim of avoiding bleak future scenarios.
Other authors take a rather critical view point. Themes linked to sustainability emerge as multi-causal, paradoxical and ambiguous problems which require a interdisciplinary approach. (O`Riordan, 1993). As it is by nature an interdisciplinary study topic, it requires a paradigm break and the construction of living knowledge, where aspects of traditional science unite with local forms of knowledge (Murdoch & Clark, 1994). The understanding of what is government, company or consumer can be only historically, socially and locally constructed.
According to Beck’s (1992) approach, the individual begins to establish rational or even intuitive criticism of himself and the social systems in which he is inserted. He comes face to face with the possibility that his current reality could be the consequence of his past actions, being led to question his current conditions and resources and the probability that future risks may result from his present actions. Thus, the person becomes a reflexive being and a problem for himself, both in relation to what he knows and to what he doesn’t know, also becoming suspicious of what others state they know or do not know.
These ambiguities, paradoxes and contradictions lead, in Engeström’s (2001) understanding, to expansive development for individuals and collectives. As contradictions arise, communities question existing practices and an analysis of the situation leads to the realization that the primary contradiction cannot be resolved with the existing knowledge. The activity must then be redefined by questioning basic assumptions and understandings about work and new activity models are implemented, causing new contradictions. Changes in individual habits and practices resulting from this development can no longer be seen as the unique action of an individual or group. These cycles are both individual and collective processes. Recursive and reflexive changes in basic assumptions and comprehensions are followed by practical changes, this being a prerequisite for development processes within organizations.
This work aims to analyze, discuss and problematize the interaction and relationships between managers of hospitality sector companies and members of solid waste collector cooperatives in the city of São Paulo. More specifically, it exposes and analyses the tensions and contradictions that have emerged in the meanings attributed by managers to their work in relation to different stakeholders, after specific solid waste legislation came into effect in the municipality of São Paulo.
The data on which the work is based is part of a doctoral thesis. The methodology used was cooperative investigation (Heron; Reason, 2006). Data collection was carried out via meetings and reflexive interviews with the hotel chain managers and between the managers and members of the collector cooperative. These meetings were transcribed to the researchers’ field notebook and then analyzed in search of changes in meanings and understandings expressed by the managers.
The main results of the research work revealed changes in the way the managers understood the less privileged employees’ education about waste handling, after the interaction with the collector’s cooperative. This audience began to be seen as detaining knowledge and ability to contribute with solutions. Another change was the perception of the collector cooperatives itself, which were no longer seen as a needy audience and were now understood as specialists in legal environments and people worthy and deserving of respect as partners in dialogue. In addition, the investors’ uniquely financial and patrimonial focus began to be questioned as an obstacle to implementing profound changes in terms of sustainability. The battle between rich and poor and between neoliberalism and ecosocialism that exists in the global macro-scenario seems to be mirrored in the organizational micro-environment.
References
Beck, U. (1992) Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity, London: Sage.
Engeström, Y. (2001) Expansive Learning at Work: Toward an Activity Theoretical Reconceptualization, Journal of Education and Work, 14 (1) p. 133–156.
Heron, J.; Reason, P. (2006\) The Practice of Co-operative Inquiry: Research with rather than on people. In: Reason, P.; Bradbury, H. Handbook of Action Research. London: Sage, p. 144-149.
Murdoch, J.; Clark, J. (1994) Sustainable Knowledge, Geoforum, 25 (2), p. 115-132.
O'Riordan, T. (1993) The Politics of Sustainability, In: Turner, R. K., Ed. (1993) Sustainable Environmental Economics and Management: London: Belhaven Press.
Shrivastava P. (1995) The Role of Corporations in Achieving Ecological Sustainability, The Academy of Management Review, 20 (4), p. 936-960.
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Name: ISTR 10th International Conference
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http://www.istr.org


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MLA Citation:

Bidart de Novaes, Marcos. "Private company managers and employees and third sector organization members interacting: solid waste as a theme and a problem" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISTR 10th International Conference, Universita Degli Studi Di Siena, Siena, Italy, Jul 10, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p550476_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bidart de Novaes, M. , 2012-07-10 "Private company managers and employees and third sector organization members interacting: solid waste as a theme and a problem" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISTR 10th International Conference, Universita Degli Studi Di Siena, Siena, Italy <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p550476_index.html

Publication Type: Full Research Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Private company managers and employees and third sector organization members interacting: solid waste as a theme and a problem

Shrivastava (1995) propose, in a functionalist and prescriptive way that the responsibility to solve problems related to climate change should be divided into three parts: government, consumers and companies. Governmental actions have their limits, as do the actions of individual consumers, requiring companies to also engage voluntarily in actions. These actions are increasingly taking place along with third sector organizations, with the aim of avoiding bleak future scenarios.
Other authors take a rather critical view point. Themes linked to sustainability emerge as multi-causal, paradoxical and ambiguous problems which require a interdisciplinary approach. (O`Riordan, 1993). As it is by nature an interdisciplinary study topic, it requires a paradigm break and the construction of living knowledge, where aspects of traditional science unite with local forms of knowledge (Murdoch & Clark, 1994). The understanding of what is government, company or consumer can be only historically, socially and locally constructed.
According to Beck’s (1992) approach, the individual begins to establish rational or even intuitive criticism of himself and the social systems in which he is inserted. He comes face to face with the possibility that his current reality could be the consequence of his past actions, being led to question his current conditions and resources and the probability that future risks may result from his present actions. Thus, the person becomes a reflexive being and a problem for himself, both in relation to what he knows and to what he doesn’t know, also becoming suspicious of what others state they know or do not know.
These ambiguities, paradoxes and contradictions lead, in Engeström’s (2001) understanding, to expansive development for individuals and collectives. As contradictions arise, communities question existing practices and an analysis of the situation leads to the realization that the primary contradiction cannot be resolved with the existing knowledge. The activity must then be redefined by questioning basic assumptions and understandings about work and new activity models are implemented, causing new contradictions. Changes in individual habits and practices resulting from this development can no longer be seen as the unique action of an individual or group. These cycles are both individual and collective processes. Recursive and reflexive changes in basic assumptions and comprehensions are followed by practical changes, this being a prerequisite for development processes within organizations.
This work aims to analyze, discuss and problematize the interaction and relationships between managers of hospitality sector companies and members of solid waste collector cooperatives in the city of São Paulo. More specifically, it exposes and analyses the tensions and contradictions that have emerged in the meanings attributed by managers to their work in relation to different stakeholders, after specific solid waste legislation came into effect in the municipality of São Paulo.
The data on which the work is based is part of a doctoral thesis. The methodology used was cooperative investigation (Heron; Reason, 2006). Data collection was carried out via meetings and reflexive interviews with the hotel chain managers and between the managers and members of the collector cooperative. These meetings were transcribed to the researchers’ field notebook and then analyzed in search of changes in meanings and understandings expressed by the managers.
The main results of the research work revealed changes in the way the managers understood the less privileged employees’ education about waste handling, after the interaction with the collector’s cooperative. This audience began to be seen as detaining knowledge and ability to contribute with solutions. Another change was the perception of the collector cooperatives itself, which were no longer seen as a needy audience and were now understood as specialists in legal environments and people worthy and deserving of respect as partners in dialogue. In addition, the investors’ uniquely financial and patrimonial focus began to be questioned as an obstacle to implementing profound changes in terms of sustainability. The battle between rich and poor and between neoliberalism and ecosocialism that exists in the global macro-scenario seems to be mirrored in the organizational micro-environment.
References
Beck, U. (1992) Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity, London: Sage.
Engeström, Y. (2001) Expansive Learning at Work: Toward an Activity Theoretical Reconceptualization, Journal of Education and Work, 14 (1) p. 133–156.
Heron, J.; Reason, P. (2006\) The Practice of Co-operative Inquiry: Research with rather than on people. In: Reason, P.; Bradbury, H. Handbook of Action Research. London: Sage, p. 144-149.
Murdoch, J.; Clark, J. (1994) Sustainable Knowledge, Geoforum, 25 (2), p. 115-132.
O'Riordan, T. (1993) The Politics of Sustainability, In: Turner, R. K., Ed. (1993) Sustainable Environmental Economics and Management: London: Belhaven Press.
Shrivastava P. (1995) The Role of Corporations in Achieving Ecological Sustainability, The Academy of Management Review, 20 (4), p. 936-960.


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