Citation

Vitriolic Verse, Reflexive Triangularity and the Identity Politics of African-American Poets in the Nineteenth Century

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Abstract:

In this presentation, I argue how oft-overlooked Black poets in the nineteenth century challenge the idea that black Americans were wholly assimilative to the notion of an American identity. Rather, I posit that African Americans – poets and otherwise – utilized a critical lens of reflexive triangularity in articulating their outrage and advancing their cause for freedom; that is, African Americans would invoke their American-ness in arguing for their equal inclusion within the state (and thus their entitlement of rights therein) while also invoking their kinship with Africa and the African diaspora to critique the (white) system(s) of hegemony that prevented blacks (free and enslaved) from obtaining said rights and liberties. Thus, black poets serve as an instructive lens for understanding how the liminal space(s) of the “other” rejects an insider/outsider binary. They at once sought inclusion while signifying on their relationship to the excluded, ossifying a diasporic link with African (and, at times, Native American) “others” in the process.

In making this claim, I highlight the evolution of identity politics within increasingly American-born generations of Blacks reconciling dualities or multiplicities of otherness and homespace as displaced persons of African descent. Using the historical narrative of colonization and expatriation as a backdrop, I highlight how these poetics of rage from oft-understudied Black poets offer a framework for understanding the complicated (and sometimes ostensibly contradictory) nuances of marginalized peoples as agents of resistance.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

american (9), black (7), african (5), poet (5), ident (3), nineteenth (2), thus (2), triangular (2), other (2), invok (2), histor (2), inclus (2), polit (2), highlight (2), understand (2), argu (2), within (2), centuri (2), oft (2), use (2), len (2),
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Association:
Name: 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p553619_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hendrickson, Jason. "Vitriolic Verse, Reflexive Triangularity and the Identity Politics of African-American Poets in the Nineteenth Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Mar 07, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p553619_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hendrickson, J. T. , 2012-03-07 "Vitriolic Verse, Reflexive Triangularity and the Identity Politics of African-American Poets in the Nineteenth Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-24 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p553619_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this presentation, I argue how oft-overlooked Black poets in the nineteenth century challenge the idea that black Americans were wholly assimilative to the notion of an American identity. Rather, I posit that African Americans – poets and otherwise – utilized a critical lens of reflexive triangularity in articulating their outrage and advancing their cause for freedom; that is, African Americans would invoke their American-ness in arguing for their equal inclusion within the state (and thus their entitlement of rights therein) while also invoking their kinship with Africa and the African diaspora to critique the (white) system(s) of hegemony that prevented blacks (free and enslaved) from obtaining said rights and liberties. Thus, black poets serve as an instructive lens for understanding how the liminal space(s) of the “other” rejects an insider/outsider binary. They at once sought inclusion while signifying on their relationship to the excluded, ossifying a diasporic link with African (and, at times, Native American) “others” in the process.

In making this claim, I highlight the evolution of identity politics within increasingly American-born generations of Blacks reconciling dualities or multiplicities of otherness and homespace as displaced persons of African descent. Using the historical narrative of colonization and expatriation as a backdrop, I highlight how these poetics of rage from oft-understudied Black poets offer a framework for understanding the complicated (and sometimes ostensibly contradictory) nuances of marginalized peoples as agents of resistance.


Similar Titles:
Identity Politics and Cultural Hybridity: African Americans and African Canadians in the Black Protestant Church, 1825-1910

Laboring in Intimacy: Labor Relations and Intimacy among Black Women and White Women in Nineteenth-Century African American Women’s Narratives

"Africanity" and Early African American Identity Politics: from late 18th through early 20th centuries


 
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