Citation

In Need of Leverage: The Blind Spot with Focusing on Identity and School Outlooks

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Abstract:

Drawing on ethnographic data and interviews with Latino male youth in Los Angeles,
I show that despite having a strong ethnic identity, children of Mexican immigrants cannot be described as embracing a “reactive identity” nor embracing an “oppositional” attitude towards education. I describe the boundaries the second-generation draws between themselves and third-generation Mexicans and Blacks and the separate identity they carve out for themselves in the urban context. Children of immigrants draw from their immigrant parents strive to succeed in the US to feed their ethnic identity and their perceptions of social mobility opportunities in the US. While most are cognizant that ethnic or racial discrimination takes place against the Mexican-origin group, most do not consider it to be an obstacle for their success. Children of Mexican immigrants are generally optimistic about their futures, not wary. Despite this optimism, I concur with Telles and Ortiz (2008) that poor educational attainment of the Mexican-origin group is the “linchpin” of the groups’ ethnic persistence and the barrier towards their socioeconomic integration. I show second-generation Latinos value education but reject the schooling process. I highlight the distinction young men make between education or learning and schooling. I find that central to school disengagement are the social relationships established in the classroom, primarily between teacher and students, which are the foundation for social capital formation in the school context.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

school (134), like (111), young (105), mexican (97), men (92), class (89), work (61), social (59), ethnic (50), student (49), would (47), immigr (46), studi (45), teacher (44), colleg (44), know (43), one (42), educ (42), high (38), black (34), go (33),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p561989_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Rendon, Maria. "In Need of Leverage: The Blind Spot with Focusing on Identity and School Outlooks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p561989_index.html>

APA Citation:

Rendon, M. G. , 2012-08-16 "In Need of Leverage: The Blind Spot with Focusing on Identity and School Outlooks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO Online <PDF>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p561989_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on ethnographic data and interviews with Latino male youth in Los Angeles,
I show that despite having a strong ethnic identity, children of Mexican immigrants cannot be described as embracing a “reactive identity” nor embracing an “oppositional” attitude towards education. I describe the boundaries the second-generation draws between themselves and third-generation Mexicans and Blacks and the separate identity they carve out for themselves in the urban context. Children of immigrants draw from their immigrant parents strive to succeed in the US to feed their ethnic identity and their perceptions of social mobility opportunities in the US. While most are cognizant that ethnic or racial discrimination takes place against the Mexican-origin group, most do not consider it to be an obstacle for their success. Children of Mexican immigrants are generally optimistic about their futures, not wary. Despite this optimism, I concur with Telles and Ortiz (2008) that poor educational attainment of the Mexican-origin group is the “linchpin” of the groups’ ethnic persistence and the barrier towards their socioeconomic integration. I show second-generation Latinos value education but reject the schooling process. I highlight the distinction young men make between education or learning and schooling. I find that central to school disengagement are the social relationships established in the classroom, primarily between teacher and students, which are the foundation for social capital formation in the school context.


Similar Titles:
“OUR Stories: An ethnically focused supplemental education program designed to engage high school age students in the discovery and writing of history of the Black experience in Cleveland, Ohio.”

Out-of-Class Educational Experiences for At-Risk High School Students and Pre-Service Teachers

Transforming Language Instruction for Social Justice: A Study of Four High School English Teachers’ Development of Critical Language Pedagogy for African American Students


 
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