Citation

Saying "Yes" to Taxes: The Politics of Tax Reform Campaigns in 3 Northwestern States, 1965-1973

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Scant attention has been paid to the adoption of new taxes by many American states during the 1960s and the implications of this period for theories of the relationship between direct democracy, electoral politics, and tax policy. Using a comparative historical methodology, I examine electoral campaigns for tax reform in three Northwestern states — Oregon, Washington, and Idaho — where ballot measures brought new taxes directly to voters with divergent outcomes. Why did some states adopt new taxes during this pivotal decade while other states failed repeatedly? I argue that the electoral politics of taxation were shaped by institutional environments that influenced public debates over new taxes. Where voter approval was a prerequisite for implementing new taxes, as in Oregon and Washington, tax opponents used strategies of obfuscation to generate voter uncertainty over the impact of proposed tax regimes. However, where new taxes could be implemented prior to a referendum, direct experience of new tax regimes reduced uncertainty, allowing pro-tax coalitions to take advantage of material and rhetorical resources generated by new tax revenue. My analysis challenges popular views that institutions of direct democracy are perpetually hostile to tax increases, explicating how these institutions can articulate with progressive tax policies. My work also expands a growing literature on policy design and taxation. Finally, this research recovers a progressive history of state-level state building, adding to a growing body of fiscal sociology literature by emphasizing the importance of studying state-level tax policies in understanding the politics of taxation in America.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

tax (255), state (86), new (71), sale (61), voter (61), reform (52), idaho (38), washington (35), polit (35), polici (34), oregon (33), incom (29), plan (27), institut (27), campaign (25), would (25), 1960s (24), adopt (23), propos (22), revenu (21), direct (19),
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562452_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Pearson, Elizabeth. "Saying "Yes" to Taxes: The Politics of Tax Reform Campaigns in 3 Northwestern States, 1965-1973" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562452_index.html>

APA Citation:

Pearson, E. , 2012-08-16 "Saying "Yes" to Taxes: The Politics of Tax Reform Campaigns in 3 Northwestern States, 1965-1973" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562452_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scant attention has been paid to the adoption of new taxes by many American states during the 1960s and the implications of this period for theories of the relationship between direct democracy, electoral politics, and tax policy. Using a comparative historical methodology, I examine electoral campaigns for tax reform in three Northwestern states — Oregon, Washington, and Idaho — where ballot measures brought new taxes directly to voters with divergent outcomes. Why did some states adopt new taxes during this pivotal decade while other states failed repeatedly? I argue that the electoral politics of taxation were shaped by institutional environments that influenced public debates over new taxes. Where voter approval was a prerequisite for implementing new taxes, as in Oregon and Washington, tax opponents used strategies of obfuscation to generate voter uncertainty over the impact of proposed tax regimes. However, where new taxes could be implemented prior to a referendum, direct experience of new tax regimes reduced uncertainty, allowing pro-tax coalitions to take advantage of material and rhetorical resources generated by new tax revenue. My analysis challenges popular views that institutions of direct democracy are perpetually hostile to tax increases, explicating how these institutions can articulate with progressive tax policies. My work also expands a growing literature on policy design and taxation. Finally, this research recovers a progressive history of state-level state building, adding to a growing body of fiscal sociology literature by emphasizing the importance of studying state-level tax policies in understanding the politics of taxation in America.


Similar Titles:
Income Inequality, Political Institutions, and Unequal Policy Responsiveness in the American States

Energy Policy and Political Culture: Renewable Reform at the State Level


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.