Citation

Dead Men Do Tell Tales: Forensic anthropology of one of Penn Museum’s oldest mummies

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Abstract:

Jane A. Hill (University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology)
and
Maria A. Rosado (Rowan University)

Recent inventory of the Predynastic Egyptian collection in the University of Pennsylvania Museum revealed a flexed bundle burial (E 16229), one of two Predynastic human burials donated to the Museum in 1898. Dated by J.E. Quibell to the late Predynastic period and attributed to the site of Naqada, these human remains exhibit many interesting features of the Egyptians’ early experimentation with different mummification techniques. Some of these techniques include the use of different types of cloth wrapping, basketry and an exterior animal skin envelope sewn together to contain the mummy. Evidence of postmortem reconstruction, including an internal wooden support inserted along the individual’s vertebral column and the packing of the body’s abdominal cavity with twists of cloth soaked in resin, was also uncovered. An interdisciplinary forensic anthropology investigation utilizing minimally invasive sampling techniques and X-ray analysis was undertaken in the summer 2011 to address numerous questions about this individual including preservation, sex, age, stature, paleopathology, and diet. Using the Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Florescence Spectrometer (WDXRFS), courtesy of Rowan University’s Physics and Astronomy Department, researchers have obtained an elemental breakdown of human bone fragments and resins covering the body which shed light on the individual’s diet and the chemical composition of the unguents with which the body was treated. Additional analysis of the cultural artifacts included in the burial and the treatment of the body as the subject and object of ritual and memory are also discussed.
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Association:
Name: The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt
URL:
http://www.arce.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562490_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hill, Jane. and Rosado, Maria. "Dead Men Do Tell Tales: Forensic anthropology of one of Penn Museum’s oldest mummies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Renaissance Providence Hotel, Providence, RI, Apr 27, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562490_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hill, J. and Rosado, M. A. , 2012-04-27 "Dead Men Do Tell Tales: Forensic anthropology of one of Penn Museum’s oldest mummies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Renaissance Providence Hotel, Providence, RI <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562490_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Jane A. Hill (University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology)
and
Maria A. Rosado (Rowan University)

Recent inventory of the Predynastic Egyptian collection in the University of Pennsylvania Museum revealed a flexed bundle burial (E 16229), one of two Predynastic human burials donated to the Museum in 1898. Dated by J.E. Quibell to the late Predynastic period and attributed to the site of Naqada, these human remains exhibit many interesting features of the Egyptians’ early experimentation with different mummification techniques. Some of these techniques include the use of different types of cloth wrapping, basketry and an exterior animal skin envelope sewn together to contain the mummy. Evidence of postmortem reconstruction, including an internal wooden support inserted along the individual’s vertebral column and the packing of the body’s abdominal cavity with twists of cloth soaked in resin, was also uncovered. An interdisciplinary forensic anthropology investigation utilizing minimally invasive sampling techniques and X-ray analysis was undertaken in the summer 2011 to address numerous questions about this individual including preservation, sex, age, stature, paleopathology, and diet. Using the Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Florescence Spectrometer (WDXRFS), courtesy of Rowan University’s Physics and Astronomy Department, researchers have obtained an elemental breakdown of human bone fragments and resins covering the body which shed light on the individual’s diet and the chemical composition of the unguents with which the body was treated. Additional analysis of the cultural artifacts included in the burial and the treatment of the body as the subject and object of ritual and memory are also discussed.


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