Citation

Your Friends Get Flu Before You Do, and a Panel of Friends Can Predict Epidemics

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Abstract:

In a groundbreaking study, Christakis and Fowler (2010) showed that the friends of a random sample of Harvard students contracted the flu an average of two weeks before the random sample itself. These findings provide direct evidence that people’s friends tend to get the flu before they do, and they also show that the friends of a random sample can be effective advanced sensors for a population. However, we discuss several reasons why individuals chosen only because they are central in networks may be highly unrepresentative and misleading as advanced sensors. In particular, we suggest that the disease experience of many friends of a large random sample are likely to be indicative of spread within different clusters at different times, while the experiences of the most central individuals may not be.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

friend (98), peopl (93), central (93), diseas (87), network (61), sampl (53), individu (51), infect (51), random (51), spread (48), would (46), like (43), flu (40), contact (37), popul (35), panel (35), suggest (34), one (32), use (30), could (29), contract (28),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562683_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Feld, Scott. "Your Friends Get Flu Before You Do, and a Panel of Friends Can Predict Epidemics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562683_index.html>

APA Citation:

Feld, S. L. , 2012-08-16 "Your Friends Get Flu Before You Do, and a Panel of Friends Can Predict Epidemics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO Online <PDF>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562683_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In a groundbreaking study, Christakis and Fowler (2010) showed that the friends of a random sample of Harvard students contracted the flu an average of two weeks before the random sample itself. These findings provide direct evidence that people’s friends tend to get the flu before they do, and they also show that the friends of a random sample can be effective advanced sensors for a population. However, we discuss several reasons why individuals chosen only because they are central in networks may be highly unrepresentative and misleading as advanced sensors. In particular, we suggest that the disease experience of many friends of a large random sample are likely to be indicative of spread within different clusters at different times, while the experiences of the most central individuals may not be.


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With Friends Like These: Social Distance and Networks of Aggression


 
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