Citation

Where are the Children? Examining Primetime Network TV Shows and Viewers’ Favorite Shows, 1994-2009

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Abstract:

Media representations of specific groups, including their absence, impact people’s perceptions of these groups. We examine all primetime network televisions shows in 1994, 1999, 2004, and 2009 to determine whether children are present and in central roles. We compare overall trends in the presence and centrality of children to those in the most-watched shows reported by people and, specifically, tweens and teens. We find that the proportion of shows on air including children present dropped from 1994 to 2009 (from 69% to 52%). This decline over time was sharper for the most popular shows, although, in each year, tweens and teens’ favorite shows are more likely to include children than are American’s favorite shows. Shows with children in central roles also declined sharply from 1994 to 2009; in 1994 approximately three-quarters of favorite shows (whether of people, tweens, or teens) included at least one child in a central role; however, this declined to less than one-third of shows in 2009. Tweens’ most-watched shows saw the largest decline in the proportion with children in central roles (from 79% in 1994 to 5% in 2009). The only gender difference was a sharper decline for teen girls than boys; the proportion of girls’ favorite shows including children in a central role dropped 55 percent over the 15 year period while that for boys dropped 25 percent. Children are not only seeing fewer representations of themselves on primetime network television in 2009 than in 1994, they also are watching fewer shows that include children.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

children (112), show (108), televis (107), 2009 (44), program (43), teen (43), 1994 (41), central (38), network (37), includ (37), percent (36), primetim (33), role (33), group (30), age (28), media (27), tween (27), charact (27), year (26), time (25), child (24),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563269_index.html
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MLA Citation:

McCabe, Janice., Harvey, Amber. and Richburg, Kayla. "Where are the Children? Examining Primetime Network TV Shows and Viewers’ Favorite Shows, 1994-2009" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563269_index.html>

APA Citation:

McCabe, J. , Harvey, A. and Richburg, K. , 2012-08-16 "Where are the Children? Examining Primetime Network TV Shows and Viewers’ Favorite Shows, 1994-2009" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563269_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media representations of specific groups, including their absence, impact people’s perceptions of these groups. We examine all primetime network televisions shows in 1994, 1999, 2004, and 2009 to determine whether children are present and in central roles. We compare overall trends in the presence and centrality of children to those in the most-watched shows reported by people and, specifically, tweens and teens. We find that the proportion of shows on air including children present dropped from 1994 to 2009 (from 69% to 52%). This decline over time was sharper for the most popular shows, although, in each year, tweens and teens’ favorite shows are more likely to include children than are American’s favorite shows. Shows with children in central roles also declined sharply from 1994 to 2009; in 1994 approximately three-quarters of favorite shows (whether of people, tweens, or teens) included at least one child in a central role; however, this declined to less than one-third of shows in 2009. Tweens’ most-watched shows saw the largest decline in the proportion with children in central roles (from 79% in 1994 to 5% in 2009). The only gender difference was a sharper decline for teen girls than boys; the proportion of girls’ favorite shows including children in a central role dropped 55 percent over the 15 year period while that for boys dropped 25 percent. Children are not only seeing fewer representations of themselves on primetime network television in 2009 than in 1994, they also are watching fewer shows that include children.


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