Citation

Marital Status, Self-rated Health, and Mortality: Overestimation of Health or Diminishing Protection of Marriage?

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Abstract:

This study challenges two well-established associations in medical sociology: the predictive power of self-rated health on mortality and the beneficial effect of marriage on health. Using the National Health Interview Survey 1986-2004 with 1986-2006 mortality follow-up (789,096 respondents with 24,095 deaths) and Cox Proportional Hazards Models, we find that the power of self-rated health to predict mortality is higher for the married than for any unmarried group. By using nonparametric ordered logistic regression models, we find thresholds shift such that, compared to the unmarried, the married may not report poorer health until developing more severe health problems. These findings suggest that, relative to the unmarried, the married tend to overestimate their health status. We also find the protective effect of marriage against mortality decreases with deteriorating health so that the married and unmarried in “poor” health are at similar risk for death. This finding generally holds for objective health measures as well.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

health (255), mortal (144), rate (116), marri (115), self (112), self-rat (96), status (90), marit (72), differ (57), srh (54), risk (49), marriag (48), hazard (48), may (48), predict (45), report (45), effect (43), power (40), poor (39), studi (39), protect (38),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563667_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Thomas, Patricia. "Marital Status, Self-rated Health, and Mortality: Overestimation of Health or Diminishing Protection of Marriage?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563667_index.html>

APA Citation:

Thomas, P. A. , 2012-08-16 "Marital Status, Self-rated Health, and Mortality: Overestimation of Health or Diminishing Protection of Marriage?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563667_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study challenges two well-established associations in medical sociology: the predictive power of self-rated health on mortality and the beneficial effect of marriage on health. Using the National Health Interview Survey 1986-2004 with 1986-2006 mortality follow-up (789,096 respondents with 24,095 deaths) and Cox Proportional Hazards Models, we find that the power of self-rated health to predict mortality is higher for the married than for any unmarried group. By using nonparametric ordered logistic regression models, we find thresholds shift such that, compared to the unmarried, the married may not report poorer health until developing more severe health problems. These findings suggest that, relative to the unmarried, the married tend to overestimate their health status. We also find the protective effect of marriage against mortality decreases with deteriorating health so that the married and unmarried in “poor” health are at similar risk for death. This finding generally holds for objective health measures as well.


Similar Titles:
Predictive Strength of Self-rated Health on Mortality Risk Across Racial and Ethnic Groups


 
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