Citation

National Giving: The Construction of Jewish American National-philanthropic Networks

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Despite the centrality of gift giving and reciprocity in the national rhetoric and the self understanding of members, scholars have generally refrained from studying giving to the nation as a mechanism of nation building and instead treat willingness to sacrifice for the nation as merely a sign of already existing national attachments. While gift giving is widely acknowledged as a practice that creates social ties and obligation, in modern settings researchers often treat gift giving as an interpersonal matter, not relevant to the grander scale of the nation. This paper challenges this avoidance by examining the mechanism that the Zionist movement created to secure a stream of donations from their compatriots in the United States in the 1940s. Instead of treating philanthropic giving as a mere instrumentality or an outcome of primordial Jewish tradition, I treat charitable giving as practical accomplishment and a medium through which diaspora groups negotiate their position within the nation. My analysis focuses on the minute practices developed in order to procure donations examining how national movements create the obligation to give in the absence of counter gift. It shows that rather than simply emphasizing the unity of the nation as a means to loosen purse strings, national giving rests on a concomitant marking and blurring of the differences between homeland and diaspora groups. I use this observation to argue that internal differences are not merely an obstacle but can sometimes play a productive constitutive role in the process of nation building.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

nation (120), uja (104), give (99), jewish (81), gift (73), donor (54), campaign (46), communiti (44), organ (42), american (37), repres (30), field (29), donat (29), differ (24), one (24), member (22), new (22), collect (22), local (21), creat (20), unit (20),
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563668_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Lainer-Vos, Dan. "National Giving: The Construction of Jewish American National-philanthropic Networks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563668_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lainer-Vos, D. , 2012-08-16 "National Giving: The Construction of Jewish American National-philanthropic Networks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO Online <PDF>. 2014-12-12 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563668_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the centrality of gift giving and reciprocity in the national rhetoric and the self understanding of members, scholars have generally refrained from studying giving to the nation as a mechanism of nation building and instead treat willingness to sacrifice for the nation as merely a sign of already existing national attachments. While gift giving is widely acknowledged as a practice that creates social ties and obligation, in modern settings researchers often treat gift giving as an interpersonal matter, not relevant to the grander scale of the nation. This paper challenges this avoidance by examining the mechanism that the Zionist movement created to secure a stream of donations from their compatriots in the United States in the 1940s. Instead of treating philanthropic giving as a mere instrumentality or an outcome of primordial Jewish tradition, I treat charitable giving as practical accomplishment and a medium through which diaspora groups negotiate their position within the nation. My analysis focuses on the minute practices developed in order to procure donations examining how national movements create the obligation to give in the absence of counter gift. It shows that rather than simply emphasizing the unity of the nation as a means to loosen purse strings, national giving rests on a concomitant marking and blurring of the differences between homeland and diaspora groups. I use this observation to argue that internal differences are not merely an obstacle but can sometimes play a productive constitutive role in the process of nation building.


Similar Titles:
All Politics that Matters Isn't Local: Venue Shopping, Strategies and Early Results of National Campaigns by Community Organizations

"There's Nothing Wrong With the United Nations - Except It's Members": The United Nations Security Council, the G4 and the Implications for Contemporary Collective Security


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.