Citation

Contesting Race and Space in Boston's Chinatown, 1950-1965

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper examines the physical and cultural transformation of Boston’s Chinatown from 1950-1965. In the early 1950s, state and city planners set in motion a number of large-scale projects that dramatically reshaped the city of Boston, with significant consequences for Chinatown and other central city neighborhoods that were targeted for urban renewal. In the wake of the repeal of Chinese Exclusion, at a time when Boston’s Chinatown was growing in numbers and expanding in size, nearly a hundred Chinatown properties were demolished in the name of urban revitalization. Families and businesses were displaced, vital community spaces disrupted, and the neighborhood nearly obliterated altogether. Yet urban renewal also produced several major housing developments, which today house the majority of Chinatown’s Asian immigrant population and which many credit with preventing the neighborhood’s demise as an Asian American home place. Using state records, community archives, and oral histories, this paper explores how urban planners, business leaders, and community activists engaged in complex, creative, and sometimes contradictory spatial practices to contest race and space in Boston Chinatown during the era of urban renewal. Although urban redevelopment in this period is often understood in terms of top-down national and municipal policies that devastated communities of color, this paper shows how Chinatown’s diverse constituents actively participated in the remaking of their own neighborhood in both formal and informal ways and with varied consequences. It also contributes an Asian American perspective to our understanding of urban renewal and redevelopment in the postwar American city.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Studies Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.theasa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p569511_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Chen, Thomas. "Contesting Race and Space in Boston's Chinatown, 1950-1965" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Puerto Rico Convention Center and the Caribe Hilton., San Juan, Puerto Rico, Nov 15, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p569511_index.html>

APA Citation:

Chen, T. , 2012-11-15 "Contesting Race and Space in Boston's Chinatown, 1950-1965" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Puerto Rico Convention Center and the Caribe Hilton., San Juan, Puerto Rico <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p569511_index.html

Publication Type: Internal Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the physical and cultural transformation of Boston’s Chinatown from 1950-1965. In the early 1950s, state and city planners set in motion a number of large-scale projects that dramatically reshaped the city of Boston, with significant consequences for Chinatown and other central city neighborhoods that were targeted for urban renewal. In the wake of the repeal of Chinese Exclusion, at a time when Boston’s Chinatown was growing in numbers and expanding in size, nearly a hundred Chinatown properties were demolished in the name of urban revitalization. Families and businesses were displaced, vital community spaces disrupted, and the neighborhood nearly obliterated altogether. Yet urban renewal also produced several major housing developments, which today house the majority of Chinatown’s Asian immigrant population and which many credit with preventing the neighborhood’s demise as an Asian American home place. Using state records, community archives, and oral histories, this paper explores how urban planners, business leaders, and community activists engaged in complex, creative, and sometimes contradictory spatial practices to contest race and space in Boston Chinatown during the era of urban renewal. Although urban redevelopment in this period is often understood in terms of top-down national and municipal policies that devastated communities of color, this paper shows how Chinatown’s diverse constituents actively participated in the remaking of their own neighborhood in both formal and informal ways and with varied consequences. It also contributes an Asian American perspective to our understanding of urban renewal and redevelopment in the postwar American city.


Similar Titles:
Asians, Latinas/os, and Whites in ‘the City with a Mission’: Contesting Race and Space in a ‘Majority-Minority’ Suburb

Race, Culture and Community-Building in the "New Boston", 1950-1969

Space Race Redux? The Emerging New Space Race and Its Implications for the Distribution of Power in the International System


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.