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Crime and Latin American Immigrant Communities: The Role of Cultural Traditions in Building Collective Efficacy

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Abstract:

Many have argued that immigrant communities exhibit most, if not all, characteristics associated with social disorganization as well as additional factors associated with increased crime such as acculturation stress and group conflict. Thus it is no surprise that for decades most theorists (and the general public) believed immigrant communities and immigrant offenders accounted for a substantial portion of American crime. Yet despite claims of immigrants’ criminal inclination, numerous studies have long shown that immigrants are not nearly as crime-prone as native-born Americans. Furthermore, several researchers, have suggested that immigrant communities may actually buffer against crime.I offer an integrated analysis exploring the roles of collective efficacy and Latin American cultural traditions in Latino immigrant communities. I argue that the nature of immigrant communities in general, and of Latin American immigrant communities specifically, is conducive to fostering collective efficacy that encourages informal social control and mitigates other crime-inducing neighborhood conditions. Data from Washington, DC, is used to explore this relationship. Ultimately, I argue that the combination of the immigrant neighborhood context, along with collective efficacy supportive ethnic traditions, enable Latino immigrant communities to buffer against crime.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p572167_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Barak, Maya. "Crime and Latin American Immigrant Communities: The Role of Cultural Traditions in Building Collective Efficacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p572167_index.html>

APA Citation:

Barak, M. P. , 2012-11-14 "Crime and Latin American Immigrant Communities: The Role of Cultural Traditions in Building Collective Efficacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p572167_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many have argued that immigrant communities exhibit most, if not all, characteristics associated with social disorganization as well as additional factors associated with increased crime such as acculturation stress and group conflict. Thus it is no surprise that for decades most theorists (and the general public) believed immigrant communities and immigrant offenders accounted for a substantial portion of American crime. Yet despite claims of immigrants’ criminal inclination, numerous studies have long shown that immigrants are not nearly as crime-prone as native-born Americans. Furthermore, several researchers, have suggested that immigrant communities may actually buffer against crime.I offer an integrated analysis exploring the roles of collective efficacy and Latin American cultural traditions in Latino immigrant communities. I argue that the nature of immigrant communities in general, and of Latin American immigrant communities specifically, is conducive to fostering collective efficacy that encourages informal social control and mitigates other crime-inducing neighborhood conditions. Data from Washington, DC, is used to explore this relationship. Ultimately, I argue that the combination of the immigrant neighborhood context, along with collective efficacy supportive ethnic traditions, enable Latino immigrant communities to buffer against crime.


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