Citation

Sexuality, Migration and HPV: Exploring the Sociocultural Context of an STI in the Black Caribbean Immigrant Population in Florida

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Abstract:

PURPOSE: HPV is very common and cervical cancer is the most common HPV-associated cancer. Additionally, all cervical cancers are often caused by the HPV infection. More women of color, including black and Hispanic women, are diagnosed with cervical cancer and at a later stage of the disease than women of other races or ethnicities. Black women have lower levels of knowledge and awareness of HPV and related preventive measures compared to whites. The proposed dissertation project will assess the knowledge, perceptions and practices surrounding human papillomavirus (HPV) risks and cervical cancer prevention amongst reproductive-aged women who have emigrated from English-speaking Caribbean countries and now live in the Tampa Bay metropolitan area. RESULTS/EXPECTED RESULTS: The results of this project will enhance existing exploratory research contributing to eliminating cancer health disparities amongst a high-risk population and identifying social determinants of health for women of color and more specifically, Black Caribbean immigrant women. DESIGN METHODS: Ethnographic methods will be employed to examine the cultural domains of women’s health-seeking behaviors regarding HPV and cervical cancer prevention, including participant observation, key-informant interviewing, focus group conduct and semi-structured interviewing to assess attitudes, available knowledge, culturally specific perceptions, and behavioral practices of women in the specified community. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: This dissertation project will: 1) contribute to literature applying anthropological perspectives and methodology to narrow the gap in available literature relevant to migration, Black Caribbean immigrant health and cancer health disparities, 2) reveal transnational cross-cultural factors affecting risk perceptions), and 3) demonstrate the need to integrate medical anthropological application into the discourse of eliminating cancer health disparities throughout the Caribbean Diaspora.
*There is no federal funding supporting this research.
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Association:
Name: 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574163_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Standifer, Maisha. "Sexuality, Migration and HPV: Exploring the Sociocultural Context of an STI in the Black Caribbean Immigrant Population in Florida" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574163_index.html>

APA Citation:

Standifer, M. "Sexuality, Migration and HPV: Exploring the Sociocultural Context of an STI in the Black Caribbean Immigrant Population in Florida" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA <Not Available>. 2014-11-24 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574163_index.html

Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: PURPOSE: HPV is very common and cervical cancer is the most common HPV-associated cancer. Additionally, all cervical cancers are often caused by the HPV infection. More women of color, including black and Hispanic women, are diagnosed with cervical cancer and at a later stage of the disease than women of other races or ethnicities. Black women have lower levels of knowledge and awareness of HPV and related preventive measures compared to whites. The proposed dissertation project will assess the knowledge, perceptions and practices surrounding human papillomavirus (HPV) risks and cervical cancer prevention amongst reproductive-aged women who have emigrated from English-speaking Caribbean countries and now live in the Tampa Bay metropolitan area. RESULTS/EXPECTED RESULTS: The results of this project will enhance existing exploratory research contributing to eliminating cancer health disparities amongst a high-risk population and identifying social determinants of health for women of color and more specifically, Black Caribbean immigrant women. DESIGN METHODS: Ethnographic methods will be employed to examine the cultural domains of women’s health-seeking behaviors regarding HPV and cervical cancer prevention, including participant observation, key-informant interviewing, focus group conduct and semi-structured interviewing to assess attitudes, available knowledge, culturally specific perceptions, and behavioral practices of women in the specified community. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: This dissertation project will: 1) contribute to literature applying anthropological perspectives and methodology to narrow the gap in available literature relevant to migration, Black Caribbean immigrant health and cancer health disparities, 2) reveal transnational cross-cultural factors affecting risk perceptions), and 3) demonstrate the need to integrate medical anthropological application into the discourse of eliminating cancer health disparities throughout the Caribbean Diaspora.
*There is no federal funding supporting this research.


Similar Titles:
Perceptions of Health, BMI and the ‘Healthy Immigrant’ Effect: A Caribbean Immigrant Exploration

Civically engaged African immigrant college students in the U.S.: Implications for immigrant populations in global contexts of higher education

Black Women, Capital Formation and Black Capitalism in the Urban Context:From Madame C.J.Walker, Mary Kay to Sylvia’s Restaurant and Beyond:Gender, the Great Migration and Black Capitalism


 
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