Citation

New Directions in Activism: Women of Faith in the 21st Century

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

For decades now scholars have charged African American religious practice with being either accommodative or resistant to structures of oppression. Curtis Evans historicizes this debate in describing the “burden of black religion” -- an expectation that such a tradition would meet “a multiplicity of interpreters’ demands ranging from uplift of the race to bringing an ambiguous quality of ‘spiritual softness’ to a materialistic and racist white culture.” This paper uses this crucible in order to ask the question what does “activism” mean for African American women of faith in the 21st century. As they are bombarded with messages of self-reliance and personal uplift coming from television icons like Oprah Winfrey and Dr. Oz to religious broadcasters like T.D. Jakes and Creflo Dollar, how have their understandings of social engagement changed? What does it mean for them to have a radical agenda for their communities and themselves? Is the personal really political? When I conducted ethnographic research among women in rural North Carolina, most of them indicated that they were not “activists,” but then proceeded to tell of their work educating youth, caring for elders, leaving abusive relationships and rallying for better environmental regulations in their communities. As the demands of twenty-first century life change – with the triumph of civil rights legislation, the prevalence of global capitalism, the upward mobility of African Americans and the preponderance of color-blind narratives of success -- how have expectations of faith and activism likewise changed? What might the faith lives of women in rural North Carolina tell us about the varying contours of activism today?
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 97th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p581153_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Frederick, Marla. "New Directions in Activism: Women of Faith in the 21st Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 97th Annual Convention, Westin Hotel and Convention Center, Pittsburgh, PA, <Not Available>. 2015-02-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p581153_index.html>

APA Citation:

Frederick, M. "New Directions in Activism: Women of Faith in the 21st Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 97th Annual Convention, Westin Hotel and Convention Center, Pittsburgh, PA <Not Available>. 2015-02-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p581153_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: For decades now scholars have charged African American religious practice with being either accommodative or resistant to structures of oppression. Curtis Evans historicizes this debate in describing the “burden of black religion” -- an expectation that such a tradition would meet “a multiplicity of interpreters’ demands ranging from uplift of the race to bringing an ambiguous quality of ‘spiritual softness’ to a materialistic and racist white culture.” This paper uses this crucible in order to ask the question what does “activism” mean for African American women of faith in the 21st century. As they are bombarded with messages of self-reliance and personal uplift coming from television icons like Oprah Winfrey and Dr. Oz to religious broadcasters like T.D. Jakes and Creflo Dollar, how have their understandings of social engagement changed? What does it mean for them to have a radical agenda for their communities and themselves? Is the personal really political? When I conducted ethnographic research among women in rural North Carolina, most of them indicated that they were not “activists,” but then proceeded to tell of their work educating youth, caring for elders, leaving abusive relationships and rallying for better environmental regulations in their communities. As the demands of twenty-first century life change – with the triumph of civil rights legislation, the prevalence of global capitalism, the upward mobility of African Americans and the preponderance of color-blind narratives of success -- how have expectations of faith and activism likewise changed? What might the faith lives of women in rural North Carolina tell us about the varying contours of activism today?


Similar Titles:
Deep-Sightings and Rescue Missions: 21st Century Radical Resistance and Activism from Women in the Academy

Deep-Sightings and Rescue Missions: 21st Century Radical Resistance and Activism from Women in the Academy

21st Century Teaching for 21st Century Students: Globalized Active Learning for Active Global Citizenship


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.