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Trust me, trust me not: An experimental analysis of the effect of transparency on trust and behavioral intentions in organizations

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Abstract:

Since the early 1990s calls for increased transparency have risen in all sectors of society. Seen as a solution to lapses of organizational ethics and misdeeds, transparency can help to restore trust, curtail employee dissatisfaction, and diminish reputational risk or damage (Bandsuch et al., 2008; Rawlins, 2009). Research has identified transparency as a two part construct highlighting either an organization’s reputation for transparency or its efforts to communicate transparently (Auger, 2010; Rawlins, 2009). Further research established the link between communicative transparency and trust (Rawlins, 2008); however, the link between organizational transparency and trust has yet to be tested. Using experimental design this study examined the relationship between both types of transparency on trust and positive behavioral intentions of stakeholders in a crisis situation. Results determined that transparent organizations that communicate transparently have higher levels of trust and positive behavioral intentions overall and more than twice the levels than non-transparent organizations that do not communicate transparently. Moreover, each of the transparency constructs was shown to have independent effects on trust and positive behavioral intentions of stakeholders in crisis.

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.71 (1), .01]. Moreover (1), risis response (1), .4 (1), .39 (1), he result (1), roups an (1), ppose (1), ere als (1), ommunicate (1), s. (1), hat use (1), .58 (1), igher (1), .83 (1), ik (1), easured (1), trongl (1), he othe (1), rust. Behaviora (1), ffecte (1),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582129_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Auger, Giselle A.. "Trust me, trust me not: An experimental analysis of the effect of transparency on trust and behavioral intentions in organizations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582129_index.html>

APA Citation:

Auger, G. , 2012-08-09 "Trust me, trust me not: An experimental analysis of the effect of transparency on trust and behavioral intentions in organizations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL Online <PDF>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582129_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the early 1990s calls for increased transparency have risen in all sectors of society. Seen as a solution to lapses of organizational ethics and misdeeds, transparency can help to restore trust, curtail employee dissatisfaction, and diminish reputational risk or damage (Bandsuch et al., 2008; Rawlins, 2009). Research has identified transparency as a two part construct highlighting either an organization’s reputation for transparency or its efforts to communicate transparently (Auger, 2010; Rawlins, 2009). Further research established the link between communicative transparency and trust (Rawlins, 2008); however, the link between organizational transparency and trust has yet to be tested. Using experimental design this study examined the relationship between both types of transparency on trust and positive behavioral intentions of stakeholders in a crisis situation. Results determined that transparent organizations that communicate transparently have higher levels of trust and positive behavioral intentions overall and more than twice the levels than non-transparent organizations that do not communicate transparently. Moreover, each of the transparency constructs was shown to have independent effects on trust and positive behavioral intentions of stakeholders in crisis.


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