Citation

When Journalism Met the Internet: Old Media and New Media Greet the Online Public

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

American news organizations have long been criticized for not more effectively anticipating, appreciating and exploiting the Internet as it became a fact of daily life in the mid-1990s. Conventional wisdom holds that a lack of planning stymied the development of journalism on the Web and cast doubt on the viability of traditional public service journalism and its enduring values of accuracy, fairness, advocacy, etc. The diminishment of these values, in turn, endangered democracy itself.
Nonetheless, news organizations that created online news sites in the 1990s did have plans, plans they outlined in the salutatories that introduced their new online products, and which contained assumptions and presumptions about the audience, the role of journalism in American society, the uses of new technology, and revenue models. These assumptions and predictions proved, for the most part, to be disastrously deficient.
How those plans panned out, however, is not the focus of this paper, which instead attempts to answer a different question: Why did journalists venturing online in the mid-1990s plan and act as they did in the areas of functionality, utility, design, marketing, anticipation of future trends and assessment of the online audience? The most compelling answers to that question are provided by the journalists themselves, in the form of salutatories they wrote for their inaugural online editions.
Taking salutatories on their own terms, in the context of their own time, reanimates a rhetorical situation by examining “those contexts in which speakers or writers create rhetorical discourse.” They tell a story not of what was happening, or what eventually happened, but of what people believed (or hoped) would happen based on what they believed was happening.
Salutatories are valuable not because they can be proved prescient or foolish in hindsight, but because they are an expression of epistemology – a speculation of the future based not just on the circumstances of the historical moment in which they are written, but also on perceptions, interpretations and assumptions about change in the past, as well as the nature of change itself.
The salutatories of Salon, Slate, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times illuminate the assumptions that propelled journalism on to the Internet in the 1990s and sowed the seeds of its ongoing struggles in the electronic environment.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

nternet change (1), uma (1), hought (1), ssumptio (1), mu (1), anit (1), yberspace (1), tar (1), estraint (1), ociet (1), yberia (1), eadenin (1), onformit (1), wa (1), ife (1), mpose (1), ndividuals i (1), rea (1), apidly escalatin (1), omanc (1), reserv (1),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582601_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Dillon, Mike. "When Journalism Met the Internet: Old Media and New Media Greet the Online Public" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582601_index.html>

APA Citation:

Dillon, M. , 2012-08-09 "When Journalism Met the Internet: Old Media and New Media Greet the Online Public" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL Online <PDF>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582601_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: American news organizations have long been criticized for not more effectively anticipating, appreciating and exploiting the Internet as it became a fact of daily life in the mid-1990s. Conventional wisdom holds that a lack of planning stymied the development of journalism on the Web and cast doubt on the viability of traditional public service journalism and its enduring values of accuracy, fairness, advocacy, etc. The diminishment of these values, in turn, endangered democracy itself.
Nonetheless, news organizations that created online news sites in the 1990s did have plans, plans they outlined in the salutatories that introduced their new online products, and which contained assumptions and presumptions about the audience, the role of journalism in American society, the uses of new technology, and revenue models. These assumptions and predictions proved, for the most part, to be disastrously deficient.
How those plans panned out, however, is not the focus of this paper, which instead attempts to answer a different question: Why did journalists venturing online in the mid-1990s plan and act as they did in the areas of functionality, utility, design, marketing, anticipation of future trends and assessment of the online audience? The most compelling answers to that question are provided by the journalists themselves, in the form of salutatories they wrote for their inaugural online editions.
Taking salutatories on their own terms, in the context of their own time, reanimates a rhetorical situation by examining “those contexts in which speakers or writers create rhetorical discourse.” They tell a story not of what was happening, or what eventually happened, but of what people believed (or hoped) would happen based on what they believed was happening.
Salutatories are valuable not because they can be proved prescient or foolish in hindsight, but because they are an expression of epistemology – a speculation of the future based not just on the circumstances of the historical moment in which they are written, but also on perceptions, interpretations and assumptions about change in the past, as well as the nature of change itself.
The salutatories of Salon, Slate, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times illuminate the assumptions that propelled journalism on to the Internet in the 1990s and sowed the seeds of its ongoing struggles in the electronic environment.


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