Citation

“From the Senate Chamber to the Oval Office: The Changing Behavior of Presidential Hopefuls in the U.S. Senate”

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Abstract:

Many scholars have regarded the U.S. Senate as a “presidential incubator” (Peabody, Ornstein, Rohde), a major source of presidential aspirants every four years. Do these Senators set themselves apart from their colleagues and other partisan contemporaries in designing a presidential bid? Over fifty Senators have thrown their hat in the ring in the past ten presidential elections, yet only four Senators have successfully captured the nomination—and only one went so far as to win the presidency—since 1972. Expanding and updating the limited literature on the subjects of legislative behavior, progressive ambition, and media visibility, we propose that Senators who anticipate and plan a run for the presidency will alter their political and legislative behavior both inside and outside the Senate chamber, most likely before publicly announcing their intentions. This effect may be magnified by the growing polarization of the Senate and the American electorate in recent decades. Using quantitative analyses, we compare those who run in their respective party’s primaries and caucuses, those who enter the “invisible primary” but never compete in a primary or caucus, and those who do not run for the White House at all in that election. We then look for differences in these Senators’ voting behavior, bill sponsorship, floor speeches, amendments, committee assignments, party rolling, and earmark usage. Furthermore, we explore media coverage, domestic and foreign travel, and fundraising in order to provide a well-rounded picture of a Senator and his or her altered behavior once he or she decides to pursue the Oval Office.
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Association:
Name: SSSA Annual Meeting
URL:
http://http://sssaonline.org/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634499_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Mugglestone, Konrad. and Nuñez, Gilbert. "“From the Senate Chamber to the Oval Office: The Changing Behavior of Presidential Hopefuls in the U.S. Senate”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana, Mar 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634499_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mugglestone, K. and Nuñez, G. D. , 2013-03-27 "“From the Senate Chamber to the Oval Office: The Changing Behavior of Presidential Hopefuls in the U.S. Senate”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634499_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many scholars have regarded the U.S. Senate as a “presidential incubator” (Peabody, Ornstein, Rohde), a major source of presidential aspirants every four years. Do these Senators set themselves apart from their colleagues and other partisan contemporaries in designing a presidential bid? Over fifty Senators have thrown their hat in the ring in the past ten presidential elections, yet only four Senators have successfully captured the nomination—and only one went so far as to win the presidency—since 1972. Expanding and updating the limited literature on the subjects of legislative behavior, progressive ambition, and media visibility, we propose that Senators who anticipate and plan a run for the presidency will alter their political and legislative behavior both inside and outside the Senate chamber, most likely before publicly announcing their intentions. This effect may be magnified by the growing polarization of the Senate and the American electorate in recent decades. Using quantitative analyses, we compare those who run in their respective party’s primaries and caucuses, those who enter the “invisible primary” but never compete in a primary or caucus, and those who do not run for the White House at all in that election. We then look for differences in these Senators’ voting behavior, bill sponsorship, floor speeches, amendments, committee assignments, party rolling, and earmark usage. Furthermore, we explore media coverage, domestic and foreign travel, and fundraising in order to provide a well-rounded picture of a Senator and his or her altered behavior once he or she decides to pursue the Oval Office.


Similar Titles:
"A Move Down Pennsylvania Avenue: The Changing Behavior of Presidential Hopefuls in the U.S. Senate”


 
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