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“I Tell My Partner Everything . . . (or Not)”: Patients’ Perceptions of Sharing Heart-Related Information With Their Partner

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Abstract:

This study is grounded in theories of information management (Greene, 2009; Petronio, 2002; see also Donovan-Kicken & Caughlin, 2010, 2011; Goldsmith, Miller, & Caughlin, 2007). Patients with a diagnosed heart-related condition (N = 253) completed a survey regarding their perceptions of sharing/not sharing information with a partner about their health condition. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results indicated that (a) most patients report that they share “everything” with their partner, (b) there are significant group differences between patients who report sharing everything with a partner and those who report not sharing certain topics in terms of communication efficacy and patterns of communication (breadth, depth, and frequency) about a heart-related condition, and (c) there are no significant differences between the two groups in terms of sharing specific physical and psychological health information. We discuss the findings and implications of the study for patients, partners, and health care providers.

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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634975_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Checton, Maria. and Greene, Kathryn. "“I Tell My Partner Everything . . . (or Not)”: Patients’ Perceptions of Sharing Heart-Related Information With Their Partner" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-09-04 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634975_index.html>

APA Citation:

Checton, M. G. and Greene, K. , 2013-06-17 "“I Tell My Partner Everything . . . (or Not)”: Patients’ Perceptions of Sharing Heart-Related Information With Their Partner" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England Online <BINARY/OCTET-STREAM>. 2018-09-04 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634975_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study is grounded in theories of information management (Greene, 2009; Petronio, 2002; see also Donovan-Kicken & Caughlin, 2010, 2011; Goldsmith, Miller, & Caughlin, 2007). Patients with a diagnosed heart-related condition (N = 253) completed a survey regarding their perceptions of sharing/not sharing information with a partner about their health condition. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results indicated that (a) most patients report that they share “everything” with their partner, (b) there are significant group differences between patients who report sharing everything with a partner and those who report not sharing certain topics in terms of communication efficacy and patterns of communication (breadth, depth, and frequency) about a heart-related condition, and (c) there are no significant differences between the two groups in terms of sharing specific physical and psychological health information. We discuss the findings and implications of the study for patients, partners, and health care providers.


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