Citation

The effect of content-focused teacher meetings, as effective teacher learning opportunities, on student reading achievement scores in first grade

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Teacher professional development has long been of interest since it may affect teachers’ learning, the practice of teaching, and student learning. Professional development is critical because, if effective, it can influence teachers’ learning, the method and practice of teaching, and student learning. Professional development can also enhance teachers’ leadership skills and strengthen the learning community. As the investment in professional development rises, policy makers have increased their search for evidence of its effects on teachers’ knowledge, teaching practice, and student learning. Further, scholars argue that research should use valid methods such as experimental or quasi-experimental designs to evaluate professional development to determine research-based evidence, and then apply this evidence to real teaching. Although substantial empirical research has used experimental design to evaluate professional development, the results of the effect on overall student achievement are mixed. In addition, there is little evidence of the effect of teachers’ professional development on disadvantaged students’ achievement. These mixed results concerning the relationship between teachers’ professional development on overall student achievement and the lack of evidence of a relationship between professional development and disadvantaged students suggest that another teacher activity, as effective professional development, might affect student learning. Specifically, a plausible activity may be content-focused teacher meetings which are implemented at the school-level. Although considerable research has focused mainly on specific interventions which are initiated outside the school, for evaluating the effectiveness of professional development, there has been little research attention given to school-based teacher learning opportunities, specifically content-focused teacher meetings. In theory, the situative perspective on teacher learning, suggested by Putnam and Borko (2000), supports that content-focused teacher meetings affect the acquisition of teacher knowledge and teaching practice. By applying Brown et al.’s (1989) situative perspective on student learning to teacher learning, Putnam and Borko (2000) argue that teacher cognition is not solely an outcome of individuals, but situated in specific contexts, social in nature, and distributed across the individual, persons, and teaching tools. Following Putnam and Borko (2000), Camburn (2010) also argued that knowledge about teaching which is acquired in their school context may be more applicable to teachers than knowledge acquired from outside the school. Extending the argument of Camburn (2010), I hypothesize that content-focused teacher meetings, as effective professional development, affect student achievement. Using Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K) data of first-grade students, teachers, and schools, I explored both the overall effects and the potential within-classroom equalizing effects of content-focused teacher meetings on students’ reading achievement. Further, I examined the distribution effect of content-focused teacher meetings across classrooms of varying students’ pretest scores and family SES. Using a two-level hierarchical linear model, the results indicated that content-focused teacher meetings were not only positively associated with classroom-level mean achievement scores but also significantly related to closing the achievement gap between students with initial lower and higher pretest scores. In addition, both of the teacher control variables, the number of college reading courses taken in college and prior motivation, were associated with decreasing the achievement gap. However, there was no difference in the distribution of content-focused teacher meetings between classrooms which were composed of students who had either high- versus low-SES, or high- versus low-pretest scores. The results of this study suggest that, rather than individual participation in formal teacher learning opportunities which are introduced from outside school, fostering content-focused teacher meetings in school may be an effective way to accomplish two key purposes of education: to increase overall student achievement and to close the achievement gap. This study is significant since the results provide evidence showing a positive relationship between content-focused teacher meetings and student achievement in U.S elementary schools. Future research needs to assess whether content-focused teacher meetings have a positive relationship with student outcomes in other nations that have different contexts.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p641333_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Kang, Ho Soo. "The effect of content-focused teacher meetings, as effective teacher learning opportunities, on student reading achievement scores in first grade" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p641333_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kang, H. , 2013-03-10 "The effect of content-focused teacher meetings, as effective teacher learning opportunities, on student reading achievement scores in first grade" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p641333_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Teacher professional development has long been of interest since it may affect teachers’ learning, the practice of teaching, and student learning. Professional development is critical because, if effective, it can influence teachers’ learning, the method and practice of teaching, and student learning. Professional development can also enhance teachers’ leadership skills and strengthen the learning community. As the investment in professional development rises, policy makers have increased their search for evidence of its effects on teachers’ knowledge, teaching practice, and student learning. Further, scholars argue that research should use valid methods such as experimental or quasi-experimental designs to evaluate professional development to determine research-based evidence, and then apply this evidence to real teaching. Although substantial empirical research has used experimental design to evaluate professional development, the results of the effect on overall student achievement are mixed. In addition, there is little evidence of the effect of teachers’ professional development on disadvantaged students’ achievement. These mixed results concerning the relationship between teachers’ professional development on overall student achievement and the lack of evidence of a relationship between professional development and disadvantaged students suggest that another teacher activity, as effective professional development, might affect student learning. Specifically, a plausible activity may be content-focused teacher meetings which are implemented at the school-level. Although considerable research has focused mainly on specific interventions which are initiated outside the school, for evaluating the effectiveness of professional development, there has been little research attention given to school-based teacher learning opportunities, specifically content-focused teacher meetings. In theory, the situative perspective on teacher learning, suggested by Putnam and Borko (2000), supports that content-focused teacher meetings affect the acquisition of teacher knowledge and teaching practice. By applying Brown et al.’s (1989) situative perspective on student learning to teacher learning, Putnam and Borko (2000) argue that teacher cognition is not solely an outcome of individuals, but situated in specific contexts, social in nature, and distributed across the individual, persons, and teaching tools. Following Putnam and Borko (2000), Camburn (2010) also argued that knowledge about teaching which is acquired in their school context may be more applicable to teachers than knowledge acquired from outside the school. Extending the argument of Camburn (2010), I hypothesize that content-focused teacher meetings, as effective professional development, affect student achievement. Using Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K) data of first-grade students, teachers, and schools, I explored both the overall effects and the potential within-classroom equalizing effects of content-focused teacher meetings on students’ reading achievement. Further, I examined the distribution effect of content-focused teacher meetings across classrooms of varying students’ pretest scores and family SES. Using a two-level hierarchical linear model, the results indicated that content-focused teacher meetings were not only positively associated with classroom-level mean achievement scores but also significantly related to closing the achievement gap between students with initial lower and higher pretest scores. In addition, both of the teacher control variables, the number of college reading courses taken in college and prior motivation, were associated with decreasing the achievement gap. However, there was no difference in the distribution of content-focused teacher meetings between classrooms which were composed of students who had either high- versus low-SES, or high- versus low-pretest scores. The results of this study suggest that, rather than individual participation in formal teacher learning opportunities which are introduced from outside school, fostering content-focused teacher meetings in school may be an effective way to accomplish two key purposes of education: to increase overall student achievement and to close the achievement gap. This study is significant since the results provide evidence showing a positive relationship between content-focused teacher meetings and student achievement in U.S elementary schools. Future research needs to assess whether content-focused teacher meetings have a positive relationship with student outcomes in other nations that have different contexts.


Similar Titles:
The Opportunity to Learn Profile: Do Schools Effectively Meet the Learning Needs of Students

The Effect of Teachers’ Education in Teaching Reading on Students Reading Score in Primary School: Examining Data from Botswana PIRLS 2011


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.