Citation

Culture and Female Labor Force Participation: A New Epidemiological Method to Estimate Exogenous Effects

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Preferences and beliefs are endogenous to markets and institutions and this seriously complicates the estimation of cultural effects on economic behavior. Building on recent epidemiological approaches in new cultural economics, I propose an innovative methodology that exploits the migration phenomenon to estimate the exogenous impact of single identifiable cultural traits. Survey-based Imputation of Synthetic Traits used as Exogenous Regressors, SISTER, instruments the cultural traits of migrated populations with imputed traits that are generated using information for non-migrating observational equivalents. By construction, imputed traits (called synthetic traits in this framework) are exogenous to the socio-economic experiences of migrants at destination. Using synthetic traits as instruments allows us to capture the non-idiosyncratic component of preferences and beliefs that migrating and non-migrating equivalents share as members of the same ethnic group, that is, their culture. I use SISTER to estimate the exogenous impact of religiosity and generalized trust on migrants’ female labor-force participation and compare my results to those obtained using previous epidemiological approaches. I find that the net absolute exogenous impact of each of these variables on FLFP is larger than that of years of schooling. Implications are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

cultur (181), trust (103), econom (100), effect (93), trait (93), social (93), countri (90), migrant (79), 3 (79), observ (75), origin (70), generat (67), 1 (67), use (64), 2 (64), particip (61), synthet (58), women (57), imput (55), religi (53), sampl (52),
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p648176_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Polavieja, Javier. "Culture and Female Labor Force Participation: A New Epidemiological Method to Estimate Exogenous Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p648176_index.html>

APA Citation:

Polavieja, J. , 2013-08-10 "Culture and Female Labor Force Participation: A New Epidemiological Method to Estimate Exogenous Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p648176_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Preferences and beliefs are endogenous to markets and institutions and this seriously complicates the estimation of cultural effects on economic behavior. Building on recent epidemiological approaches in new cultural economics, I propose an innovative methodology that exploits the migration phenomenon to estimate the exogenous impact of single identifiable cultural traits. Survey-based Imputation of Synthetic Traits used as Exogenous Regressors, SISTER, instruments the cultural traits of migrated populations with imputed traits that are generated using information for non-migrating observational equivalents. By construction, imputed traits (called synthetic traits in this framework) are exogenous to the socio-economic experiences of migrants at destination. Using synthetic traits as instruments allows us to capture the non-idiosyncratic component of preferences and beliefs that migrating and non-migrating equivalents share as members of the same ethnic group, that is, their culture. I use SISTER to estimate the exogenous impact of religiosity and generalized trust on migrants’ female labor-force participation and compare my results to those obtained using previous epidemiological approaches. I find that the net absolute exogenous impact of each of these variables on FLFP is larger than that of years of schooling. Implications are discussed.


Similar Titles:
Effects of Class-Segregated Religious Participation on Social Lives of Immigrant Bangladeshi Muslim Women in Chicago

Strength, Independence, and Economic Inequality: The Effects of Social Programs and Atlanta’s Black Popular Culture on Identity Formation among African American Women Living Below Poverty in Atlanta


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.