Citation

Access to Higher Education: The social and economic impact of Online Education on African-American students

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The struggle for equal access to higher education has remained a critical battleground for African-Americans. Education, and access to it, has remained an emancipatory ideal for blacks since the earliest stages of the African-American experience. More specifically, Americans have long viewed access to higher education as a precious commodity and a means toward upward mobility. This discussion of the opportunities and challenges for African-Americans in Higher Education proceeds in three parts. It begins with a discussion of the current status of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), noting the important but diminishing role of HBCUs in educating today¹s African-American college students. The talk then surveys the usage of affirmative action at predominantly white institutions of higher education (PWIs). The number of African-American students on the campuses of PWIs has significantly increased over the past five decades. Yet, here, I assert that despite PWIs¹ use of affirmative action in admissions and celebration of racial diversity, many African-American students remain marginalized on these campuses. The talk then concludes with critical analysis of a relatively new, but rapidly expanding, force in African-American higher education: online education. While the rise of internet-based, for-profit colleges and universities seemingly offers increased access to higher education for African-Americans, I will argue that the educational, financial, and social returns for these students and their families are minimal at best.
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p657841_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Lovelace, Daisy. "Access to Higher Education: The social and economic impact of Online Education on African-American students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin Hotel - Downtown, Indianapolis, ID, Mar 13, 2013 <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p657841_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lovelace, D. L. , 2013-03-13 "Access to Higher Education: The social and economic impact of Online Education on African-American students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin Hotel - Downtown, Indianapolis, ID <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p657841_index.html

Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The struggle for equal access to higher education has remained a critical battleground for African-Americans. Education, and access to it, has remained an emancipatory ideal for blacks since the earliest stages of the African-American experience. More specifically, Americans have long viewed access to higher education as a precious commodity and a means toward upward mobility. This discussion of the opportunities and challenges for African-Americans in Higher Education proceeds in three parts. It begins with a discussion of the current status of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), noting the important but diminishing role of HBCUs in educating today¹s African-American college students. The talk then surveys the usage of affirmative action at predominantly white institutions of higher education (PWIs). The number of African-American students on the campuses of PWIs has significantly increased over the past five decades. Yet, here, I assert that despite PWIs¹ use of affirmative action in admissions and celebration of racial diversity, many African-American students remain marginalized on these campuses. The talk then concludes with critical analysis of a relatively new, but rapidly expanding, force in African-American higher education: online education. While the rise of internet-based, for-profit colleges and universities seemingly offers increased access to higher education for African-Americans, I will argue that the educational, financial, and social returns for these students and their families are minimal at best.


Similar Titles:
Where Are All the Black Male Students? African Americans' School Achievement, the Social Psychology of Denial, and Arts Education as a Mediating Influence

The Economic and Social Impact of African American Business Women - 1840-1899

.34 ID-Laying the Groundwork for An International Online Collaboration Project Between Indonesian and American Students in Higher Education

A Statistical Look at African American and Latino Males in Higher Education: Factors Influencing Their Absence and Its Social Costs

The impact of mathematics education reform on the mathematics performance of African-American students in the United States


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.