Citation

The Whole School Approach: re-visiting the approach in the context of Nonformal Education in East Africa

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Abstract:

Since 2005, AKF/EMACK, a USAID-supported project in Kenya, has implemented the Whole School Approach (WSA) in 758 schools as a means of engendering accountability for the delivery of quality education for all children by empowering local communities, teachers, students and local education officials to assume greater ownership and responsibility for the management and performance of their schools. Communities often look outside for implementation of their development agenda, an aspect that perpetuates dependency. While poverty may be high, communities have many resources and other assets that can support development activities. WSA helps communities understand that taking a child to school is only the first step. Rather, their involvement in all aspects of education development is key to the child’s development.

The WSA has demonstrated that communities can be powerful agents in the change process. As a result of the WSA process, communities have become increasingly involved in education development. Parents are more active in monitoring the performance of their children, and schools have accessed funds from both public and private sources to improve classroom conditions and infrastructure. While originally operating wholly in rural public schools, from 2011, the project expanded to include nonformal schools in the informal settlements of Nairobi and Mombasa. The aim of this paper is to review the experiences from the two contrasting settings, and draw lessons that will inform education policies and programs in Kenya, the broader region and beyond.
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Association:
Name: 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p658924_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Alubisia, Alex. "The Whole School Approach: re-visiting the approach in the context of Nonformal Education in East Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p658924_index.html>

APA Citation:

Alubisia, A. "The Whole School Approach: re-visiting the approach in the context of Nonformal Education in East Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p658924_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Since 2005, AKF/EMACK, a USAID-supported project in Kenya, has implemented the Whole School Approach (WSA) in 758 schools as a means of engendering accountability for the delivery of quality education for all children by empowering local communities, teachers, students and local education officials to assume greater ownership and responsibility for the management and performance of their schools. Communities often look outside for implementation of their development agenda, an aspect that perpetuates dependency. While poverty may be high, communities have many resources and other assets that can support development activities. WSA helps communities understand that taking a child to school is only the first step. Rather, their involvement in all aspects of education development is key to the child’s development.

The WSA has demonstrated that communities can be powerful agents in the change process. As a result of the WSA process, communities have become increasingly involved in education development. Parents are more active in monitoring the performance of their children, and schools have accessed funds from both public and private sources to improve classroom conditions and infrastructure. While originally operating wholly in rural public schools, from 2011, the project expanded to include nonformal schools in the informal settlements of Nairobi and Mombasa. The aim of this paper is to review the experiences from the two contrasting settings, and draw lessons that will inform education policies and programs in Kenya, the broader region and beyond.


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Exploring NGO whole school approaches to human rights education: A case study of Amnesty International’s Human Rights Friendly Schools Project

(Re)conceptualizing the role of higher education in systems transformation: The case of Agricultural Education and Training in East Africa


 
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