Citation

In the Eyes of the Beholder: Majority and minority groups’ attitudes toward illegal immigrants

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Abstract:

Immigration, and specifically illegal immigration, is an important political issue in the US and in the world in general, and has precipitated heated public discourse. This research sought to examine Americans’ responses to immigration, particularly illegal immigration in the United States. More specifically, this research compares how different minority groups (African Americans and Asian Americans) compared to majority groups (White Americans) respond to illegal immigrants. The changing ethnic/racial demographics in the United States and many other countries around the world intensifies the importance of understanding how various ethnic/racial groups with different histories of immigration into the United States respond to illegal immigration. A second issue examined in this research is whether or not perspective-taking ability influences White, Black, and Asian Americans’ responses in terms of their attitudes toward to illegal immigration and support for immigration policies. Third and finally, I propose that increasing the salience of one’s ingroup’s immigration history might affect people’s ability to take the perspective of illegal immigrants; thus history salience was manipulated in this study by asking participants to reflect and write about their ingroup’s immigration history in to the United States. Results revealed that Whites showed more prejudice toward illegal immigrants than did members of either of the two minority groups. Importantly, perspective-taking was associated with more positive attitudes toward illegal immigrants by minority group members only regardless of whether or not they had reflected on their group’s immigration history. This was not the case for the White majority group. Instead, we found that perspective-taking did increase Whites’ positive attitudes toward illegal immigrants, but only when high perspective-takers first reflected on their own group history. These findings and their implications for public policy are discussed.

Author's Keywords:

Social Psychology, Immigration, Perspective-Taking, Interminority Attitudes
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Association:
Name: ISPP 36th Annual Scientific Meeting
URL:
http://ispp.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p659249_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Adelman, Levi. "In the Eyes of the Beholder: Majority and minority groups’ attitudes toward illegal immigrants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 36th Annual Scientific Meeting, Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy and Strategy, IDC–Herzliya, Herzliya, Israel, Jul 04, 2013 <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p659249_index.html>

APA Citation:

Adelman, L. , 2013-07-04 "In the Eyes of the Beholder: Majority and minority groups’ attitudes toward illegal immigrants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 36th Annual Scientific Meeting, Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy and Strategy, IDC–Herzliya, Herzliya, Israel <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p659249_index.html

Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Immigration, and specifically illegal immigration, is an important political issue in the US and in the world in general, and has precipitated heated public discourse. This research sought to examine Americans’ responses to immigration, particularly illegal immigration in the United States. More specifically, this research compares how different minority groups (African Americans and Asian Americans) compared to majority groups (White Americans) respond to illegal immigrants. The changing ethnic/racial demographics in the United States and many other countries around the world intensifies the importance of understanding how various ethnic/racial groups with different histories of immigration into the United States respond to illegal immigration. A second issue examined in this research is whether or not perspective-taking ability influences White, Black, and Asian Americans’ responses in terms of their attitudes toward to illegal immigration and support for immigration policies. Third and finally, I propose that increasing the salience of one’s ingroup’s immigration history might affect people’s ability to take the perspective of illegal immigrants; thus history salience was manipulated in this study by asking participants to reflect and write about their ingroup’s immigration history in to the United States. Results revealed that Whites showed more prejudice toward illegal immigrants than did members of either of the two minority groups. Importantly, perspective-taking was associated with more positive attitudes toward illegal immigrants by minority group members only regardless of whether or not they had reflected on their group’s immigration history. This was not the case for the White majority group. Instead, we found that perspective-taking did increase Whites’ positive attitudes toward illegal immigrants, but only when high perspective-takers first reflected on their own group history. These findings and their implications for public policy are discussed.


Similar Titles:
Perceived group size, misinformation, and political attitudes toward illegal immigrants

How Perceptions of “Us” Influence Attitudes toward “Them”: Comparative Study of Public Attitudes toward Immigrants and Ethnic Minorities


 
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