Citation

Blame and Emotion Management in Political Scandal

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Abstract:

The main argument of my work is that, next to the crisis management, management of people’s emotions is a key process taking place during the political scandal. At the beginning of the scandal, the main goal of the scandalized politician is to avoid or to attenuate negative feelings of the citizen (e.g., anger) as well as to transform them into other, “less severe” emotions (e.g. disappointment). The media and the political opponents of the scandalized one, on the other hand, try to evoke, strengthen and amplify outrage of the people because if they do not arouse public indignation regarding the scandalized event, attempt to scandalize never becomes a serious scandal.
By using the classification of accounts developed by Kathleen McGrew and the way Ulrich von Mees related them to cognitive structures of emotions (also see: Andrew Ortony, Gerald Clore and Allan Collins) as well as Bernard Weiner’s elaboration of attribution-emotions, I analyze online media coverage of three German political scandals. Online periodicals with diverging positions on the scandal are used to control for different framings of the scandalized event; however, my research focuses on how these frames are created by using differing accounts for the political incident and thereby eliciting or sometimes directly expressing and naming presupposed or requested emotions of the public. In that, media and politicians enforce not only particular interpretations of the scandalous event, but also emotion norms (cf. “feeling rules” by Arlie Russell Hochschild) regarding the political scandal.
The method used is a qualitative text analysis – so called discursive psychology (see: Derek Edwards and Jonathan Potter), in my opinion, the best measure to capture the intersection between traditionally psychological variables and social contexts as well as their embeddedness in political discources

Author's Keywords:

political scandal; emotion management; blame management; discourse analysis
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Association:
Name: ISPP 36th Annual Scientific Meeting
URL:
http://ispp.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668725_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Verbalyte, Monika. "Blame and Emotion Management in Political Scandal" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 36th Annual Scientific Meeting, Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy and Strategy, IDC–Herzliya, Herzliya, Israel, Jul 04, 2013 <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668725_index.html>

APA Citation:

Verbalyte, M. , 2013-07-04 "Blame and Emotion Management in Political Scandal" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 36th Annual Scientific Meeting, Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy and Strategy, IDC–Herzliya, Herzliya, Israel <Not Available>. 2014-12-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668725_index.html

Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The main argument of my work is that, next to the crisis management, management of people’s emotions is a key process taking place during the political scandal. At the beginning of the scandal, the main goal of the scandalized politician is to avoid or to attenuate negative feelings of the citizen (e.g., anger) as well as to transform them into other, “less severe” emotions (e.g. disappointment). The media and the political opponents of the scandalized one, on the other hand, try to evoke, strengthen and amplify outrage of the people because if they do not arouse public indignation regarding the scandalized event, attempt to scandalize never becomes a serious scandal.
By using the classification of accounts developed by Kathleen McGrew and the way Ulrich von Mees related them to cognitive structures of emotions (also see: Andrew Ortony, Gerald Clore and Allan Collins) as well as Bernard Weiner’s elaboration of attribution-emotions, I analyze online media coverage of three German political scandals. Online periodicals with diverging positions on the scandal are used to control for different framings of the scandalized event; however, my research focuses on how these frames are created by using differing accounts for the political incident and thereby eliciting or sometimes directly expressing and naming presupposed or requested emotions of the public. In that, media and politicians enforce not only particular interpretations of the scandalous event, but also emotion norms (cf. “feeling rules” by Arlie Russell Hochschild) regarding the political scandal.
The method used is a qualitative text analysis – so called discursive psychology (see: Derek Edwards and Jonathan Potter), in my opinion, the best measure to capture the intersection between traditionally psychological variables and social contexts as well as their embeddedness in political discources


Similar Titles:
Emotion Management in Political Scandal: Evoking Forgiveness

Gender, Emotion, and Politics: A Comparison of National Press Coverage of Female Political Leaders’ Emotional Management

Managing Blame in the MPs’ Expenses Scandal: a Study of Political Accounts


 
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