Citation

Educational TV Consumption and Children’s Interest in Leisure Reading and Writing: A Test of the Validated Curriculum Hypothesis

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Abstract:

The relationship between children’s TV consumption and literacy outcomes is currently unclear as past research has identified both linear (positive and negative) and curvilinear trends. It has been suggested that one source of variance in this relationship is the content children consume; specifically, researchers have argued that research-based educational TV programming (e.g., Between the Lions) should be positively related to literacy outcomes whereas non research-based programming (e.g., Boohbah) should be negatively related to literacy outcomes (what we refer to as the validated curriculum hypothesis). To test this hypothesis directly, fourth and fifth graders (N = 120) completed a survey assessing educational TV consumption and leisure reading/writing behaviors. The results upheld the validated curriculum hypothesis and revealed several key moderators including composite TV consumption and parent’s reading behavior. The results help to rectify conflicting results in the literature, support the validated curriculum hypothesis, and underscore the value of research-based educational TV programming.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

read (155), children (109), educ (85), program (75), leisur (71), televis (70), write (61), literaci (56), research (51), studi (48), consumpt (47), curriculum (44), valid (41), hypothesi (41), test (41), time (35), tv (34), earli (30), nrb (30), parent (29), 2 (28),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668814_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Martins, Nicole. and Jensen, Jakob. "Educational TV Consumption and Children’s Interest in Leisure Reading and Writing: A Test of the Validated Curriculum Hypothesis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668814_index.html>

APA Citation:

Martins, N. and Jensen, J. , 2013-08-08 "Educational TV Consumption and Children’s Interest in Leisure Reading and Writing: A Test of the Validated Curriculum Hypothesis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC Online <PDF>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668814_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The relationship between children’s TV consumption and literacy outcomes is currently unclear as past research has identified both linear (positive and negative) and curvilinear trends. It has been suggested that one source of variance in this relationship is the content children consume; specifically, researchers have argued that research-based educational TV programming (e.g., Between the Lions) should be positively related to literacy outcomes whereas non research-based programming (e.g., Boohbah) should be negatively related to literacy outcomes (what we refer to as the validated curriculum hypothesis). To test this hypothesis directly, fourth and fifth graders (N = 120) completed a survey assessing educational TV consumption and leisure reading/writing behaviors. The results upheld the validated curriculum hypothesis and revealed several key moderators including composite TV consumption and parent’s reading behavior. The results help to rectify conflicting results in the literature, support the validated curriculum hypothesis, and underscore the value of research-based educational TV programming.


Similar Titles:
Graduate Education Majors’ Relational Care and Transformations in Children’s Writing Attitudes, Competency Beliefs, and Motivation in an After School Program

Examining the Literacy Histories of Doctoral Students in an Educational Studies Program through Surveys and Interviews: A Mixed Methods Study


 
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