Citation

Hegemonic Masculinity in Sports Journalism: On the Field, but in the Classroom?

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Though the first American journalism school began in 1908, it wasn’t until the mid-1990s that sports journalism majors were created. By 2012, at least 10 American universities offered sports journalism tracks, and at least a quarter of mass communication-accredited institutions offered sports journalism courses. With the creation of these sports journalism-specific tracks comes new opportunity for educators to inform students about the role hegemonic masculinity, a critical theory that explains how ingroups maintain power, plays in sports journalism. Scholars regard sports journalism as a cultural maintenance site for hegemonic masculinity, as this theory has been used to explain the “common sense” ways in which outgroups are represented. This paper contains a brief overview of hegemonic masculinity, followed by a more in-depth section on hegemonic masculinity in sports and hegemonic masculinity in the classroom. The paper concludes with recommendations for educators regarding how to address hegemonic masculinity in the classroom and to ultimately create more critical, diverse student sports journalists.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

sport (163), masculin (63), journal (60), hegemon (59), student (40), athlet (35), femal (30), women (28), gender (26), classroom (26), illustr (25), educ (22), media (22), sex (22), male (21), univers (20), cover (20), cultur (20), journalist (20), coverag (18), communic (18),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p669208_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Reed, Sada. "Hegemonic Masculinity in Sports Journalism: On the Field, but in the Classroom?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p669208_index.html>

APA Citation:

Reed, S. , 2013-08-08 "Hegemonic Masculinity in Sports Journalism: On the Field, but in the Classroom?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC Online <PDF>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p669208_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Though the first American journalism school began in 1908, it wasn’t until the mid-1990s that sports journalism majors were created. By 2012, at least 10 American universities offered sports journalism tracks, and at least a quarter of mass communication-accredited institutions offered sports journalism courses. With the creation of these sports journalism-specific tracks comes new opportunity for educators to inform students about the role hegemonic masculinity, a critical theory that explains how ingroups maintain power, plays in sports journalism. Scholars regard sports journalism as a cultural maintenance site for hegemonic masculinity, as this theory has been used to explain the “common sense” ways in which outgroups are represented. This paper contains a brief overview of hegemonic masculinity, followed by a more in-depth section on hegemonic masculinity in sports and hegemonic masculinity in the classroom. The paper concludes with recommendations for educators regarding how to address hegemonic masculinity in the classroom and to ultimately create more critical, diverse student sports journalists.


Similar Titles:
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