Citation

News Consumption in the Age of Content Aggregation: The Case of Yahoo, Google and Huffington Post

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In the pre-Internet era, the role of news providers in the media market was clearly defined. Media companies produced content as suppliers of news and information and competed with other media firms in their geographic market for audience and/or advertising share in either inter- or intra-competition scenarios. But the Internet has brought about revolutionary changes to this media landscape. One major change is the rise of content aggregators. While traditional news firms are still struggling with the economics of their online ventures, these news aggregators have become a major source of online news for American audiences. This exploratory study, through an online survey of 1,143 respondents, empirically examines the relationship between use of three major news aggregators—Yahoo, Google, and Huffington Post— and 13 major news media outlets operated by print, broadcast, cable and electronic news media. The goal is to offer an extensive overview of competition among key players in contemporary news ecology. Findings of this study suggest a symbiotic relationship between all three news aggregator sites and 13 major news outlets across different news industries. Such findings are at odds with industry sentiment, or hostility toward news aggregators, and news organizations are encouraged to reassess their relationship with news aggregators in the attempt to find better revenue models rather than casting blames that have no empirical basis.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

news (255), aggreg (87), yahoo (61), media (60), googl (60), post (52), huffington (47), user (46), content (37), three (36), site (34), 2012 (32), newspap (30), studi (29), use (28), onlin (27), relationship (26), 2013 (25), outlet (25), model (23), non (22),
Convention
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p671244_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Lee, Angela. and Chyi, H. Iris. "News Consumption in the Age of Content Aggregation: The Case of Yahoo, Google and Huffington Post" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p671244_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lee, A. and Chyi, H. , 2013-08-08 "News Consumption in the Age of Content Aggregation: The Case of Yahoo, Google and Huffington Post" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p671244_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the pre-Internet era, the role of news providers in the media market was clearly defined. Media companies produced content as suppliers of news and information and competed with other media firms in their geographic market for audience and/or advertising share in either inter- or intra-competition scenarios. But the Internet has brought about revolutionary changes to this media landscape. One major change is the rise of content aggregators. While traditional news firms are still struggling with the economics of their online ventures, these news aggregators have become a major source of online news for American audiences. This exploratory study, through an online survey of 1,143 respondents, empirically examines the relationship between use of three major news aggregators—Yahoo, Google, and Huffington Post— and 13 major news media outlets operated by print, broadcast, cable and electronic news media. The goal is to offer an extensive overview of competition among key players in contemporary news ecology. Findings of this study suggest a symbiotic relationship between all three news aggregator sites and 13 major news outlets across different news industries. Such findings are at odds with industry sentiment, or hostility toward news aggregators, and news organizations are encouraged to reassess their relationship with news aggregators in the attempt to find better revenue models rather than casting blames that have no empirical basis.


Similar Titles:
Adopting the News Prosumer: User-Generated Content as a Strategic Resource for Local News Media

Cross-Media Ownership and Its Effect on Technological Convergence of Online News Content---A Content Analysis of 100 Internet Newspapers

Issue Advocacy and Traditional News Content: A Study of the Impact of Marketplace Advocacy on Local Television News Media

Features, Blogs and User-Generated Content Might Not Save Journalism: Evidence From a Comparative Study of the Supply and Demand of Online News


 
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