Citation

Scripted Eros: Framing analysis of sexuality-related articles in women’s and men’s magazines

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Abstract:

This analysis of sexual scripts in two men’s and two women’s magazines suggests that, regardless of the gender of the target audience, sexuality is framed mostly in ways that prioritize the narrow construction of heterosexual men’s sexual schemas according to the Centerfold Syndrome theory (Brooks, 1995). Although an illusory power is awarded to women in their role as seductresses, this construction serves mostly purposes of men’s pleasure, aligning with Gadsden’s (2000) point that male dominance over female sexuality is reinforced through media. Both women’s and men’s magazines normalize and mainstream sexual scripts that fit the elements of a constructed, hypemasculine sexuality based around men’s voyeurism and objectification of women’s bodies, emotional aloofness, trophyism, and need for sexual validation. Three additional tropes that emerged in women’s magazines – sex as dirty, women’s interest in submissive sex, and women’s potential for sexual victimization – do not feat neatly into the elements of the Centerfold Syndrome, but continue to emphasize the general cultural narrative of male dominance and female submission.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

sexual (224), women (183), men (152), magazin (116), script (109), p (105), 2012 (85), sex (66), health (58), male (44), articl (41), ero (38), content (38), cosmopolitan (37), maxim (36), femal (35), one (34), exampl (33), research (32), media (30), 2010 (28),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p671363_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Sternadori, Miglena. and Hagseth, Mandy. "Scripted Eros: Framing analysis of sexuality-related articles in women’s and men’s magazines" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p671363_index.html>

APA Citation:

Sternadori, M. and Hagseth, M. , 2013-08-08 "Scripted Eros: Framing analysis of sexuality-related articles in women’s and men’s magazines" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC Online <PDF>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p671363_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This analysis of sexual scripts in two men’s and two women’s magazines suggests that, regardless of the gender of the target audience, sexuality is framed mostly in ways that prioritize the narrow construction of heterosexual men’s sexual schemas according to the Centerfold Syndrome theory (Brooks, 1995). Although an illusory power is awarded to women in their role as seductresses, this construction serves mostly purposes of men’s pleasure, aligning with Gadsden’s (2000) point that male dominance over female sexuality is reinforced through media. Both women’s and men’s magazines normalize and mainstream sexual scripts that fit the elements of a constructed, hypemasculine sexuality based around men’s voyeurism and objectification of women’s bodies, emotional aloofness, trophyism, and need for sexual validation. Three additional tropes that emerged in women’s magazines – sex as dirty, women’s interest in submissive sex, and women’s potential for sexual victimization – do not feat neatly into the elements of the Centerfold Syndrome, but continue to emphasize the general cultural narrative of male dominance and female submission.


Similar Titles:
The Women’s Magazine Diet: A Content Analysis of Nutrition and Fitness Articles in Women’s and Women’s Health Magazines


 
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