Citation

Megan Chew: Freeway Revolt in the Forest City: The Lost Highways of Cleveland’s East Side

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Abstract:

In spring 2013, the West Shoreway in Cleveland, Ohio closed to accommodate the filming of “Captain America 2: The Winter Soldier,” leaving commuters with jammed alternate routes. Since the mid-20th century, Cleveland grew into a commuter-based metropolitan area. Despite the recent frustration with Captain America’s traffic snarl, Cleveland was not always reliant on highways and in the 1960s residents across the Cuyahoga River successfully stopped two freeway projects.

In the 1960s, many of Cleveland’s most prominent citizens resided in Cleveland’s wealthy east side suburb, Shaker Heights. Designed in the Garden City style, Shaker Heights had parkland, looping boulevards, and a rail line. In order to defuse traffic for east side commuters, the Clark and Lee freeways would reshape that carefully designed environment. The controversial freeways highlighted the class-based privileges of Shaker Heights within the larger metropolitan network of Cleveland and the difficulties of maintaining a carefully planned inner-ring suburb in an era of enthusiasm for urban renewal. The freeway revolt in Cleveland was in large part a dispute between wealthy suburbanites and Cuyahoga County Engineer Albert Porter. Porter’s efforts to reorganize Cleveland’s model suburb emphasized the difficulty of maintaining control over even the most exclusive urban neighborhoods and of keeping balance between neighborhoods and nature in the age of highways.

This controversy changed the way traffic moved through Cleveland’s east side for years and kept Shaker Heights connected to center city by the old roads. The successful revolt also kept Shaker Heights intimately connected to the city of Cleveland and its eastern neighborhoods. While their efforts maintained the well-loved Shaker Lakes parkland, they also prevented the building of a huge concrete boundary dividing the city and suburb. The exclusive Shaker Heights managed to hold onto its Garden City style while also challenging new ideas of suburban progress in the 1960s.
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Association:
Name: ASEH Conference – San Francisco
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http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p680104_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Chew, Megan. "Megan Chew: Freeway Revolt in the Forest City: The Lost Highways of Cleveland’s East Side" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Conference – San Francisco, Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p680104_index.html>

APA Citation:

Chew, M. "Megan Chew: Freeway Revolt in the Forest City: The Lost Highways of Cleveland’s East Side" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Conference – San Francisco, Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel, San Francisco, California <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p680104_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In spring 2013, the West Shoreway in Cleveland, Ohio closed to accommodate the filming of “Captain America 2: The Winter Soldier,” leaving commuters with jammed alternate routes. Since the mid-20th century, Cleveland grew into a commuter-based metropolitan area. Despite the recent frustration with Captain America’s traffic snarl, Cleveland was not always reliant on highways and in the 1960s residents across the Cuyahoga River successfully stopped two freeway projects.

In the 1960s, many of Cleveland’s most prominent citizens resided in Cleveland’s wealthy east side suburb, Shaker Heights. Designed in the Garden City style, Shaker Heights had parkland, looping boulevards, and a rail line. In order to defuse traffic for east side commuters, the Clark and Lee freeways would reshape that carefully designed environment. The controversial freeways highlighted the class-based privileges of Shaker Heights within the larger metropolitan network of Cleveland and the difficulties of maintaining a carefully planned inner-ring suburb in an era of enthusiasm for urban renewal. The freeway revolt in Cleveland was in large part a dispute between wealthy suburbanites and Cuyahoga County Engineer Albert Porter. Porter’s efforts to reorganize Cleveland’s model suburb emphasized the difficulty of maintaining control over even the most exclusive urban neighborhoods and of keeping balance between neighborhoods and nature in the age of highways.

This controversy changed the way traffic moved through Cleveland’s east side for years and kept Shaker Heights connected to center city by the old roads. The successful revolt also kept Shaker Heights intimately connected to the city of Cleveland and its eastern neighborhoods. While their efforts maintained the well-loved Shaker Lakes parkland, they also prevented the building of a huge concrete boundary dividing the city and suburb. The exclusive Shaker Heights managed to hold onto its Garden City style while also challenging new ideas of suburban progress in the 1960s.


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