Citation

Wildland Fire Management—An Overview

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Abstract:

Fire and fire management have played a substantial role in the development and maintenance of America’s wildlands. Long before European settlement, fire was used by native inhabitants as an agricultural tool and to create hunting habitat, a practice that was continued by some European settlers. Until the early 1900s, fire also was used by settlers to reduce the amount of vegetation in order to decrease the potential “fuel” for future fires.
By the beginning of the 20th century, at a time when virtually every industry and convenience of life in America relied on wood, America’s professional foresters and others saw fire as a waste of valuable forest resources. Public support for fire suppression increased after a series of large, intense fires burned vast stretches of U.S. wildlands, destroyed entire communities, and led to the loss of many lives. A tipping point came in 1910, when a wave of wildfires swept across the West, burning more than 3 million acres and leading to the loss of 78 firefighters.
In the years following the 1910 fires, Federal and State agencies strove to suppress all wildfires, but the lack of fire led to changes in the condition of some fire-dependent wildlands, and a build-up of flammable materials. Since the early 1900s, public wildfire management policy has evolved considerably. In the 1960s and 1970s, managers, scientists, and the public learned more about the fundamental role in many forest and wildland ecosystems. Fire has been gradually reintroduced through carefully controlled burns referred to as prescribed burning.
Public wildfire policy continues to evolve, as managers advance their efforts to coordinate and improve wildfire response, prevention, and restoration of fire-adapted wildlands. Much work still remains to reduce fuels to those more closely matching the ecological fire loads of natural fire regimes, especially because biomass continues to accumulate.
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Association:
Name: ASEH Conference – San Francisco
URL:
http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p680632_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Bramwell, Lincoln. "Wildland Fire Management—An Overview" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Conference – San Francisco, Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p680632_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bramwell, L. "Wildland Fire Management—An Overview" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Conference – San Francisco, Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel, San Francisco, California <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p680632_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Fire and fire management have played a substantial role in the development and maintenance of America’s wildlands. Long before European settlement, fire was used by native inhabitants as an agricultural tool and to create hunting habitat, a practice that was continued by some European settlers. Until the early 1900s, fire also was used by settlers to reduce the amount of vegetation in order to decrease the potential “fuel” for future fires.
By the beginning of the 20th century, at a time when virtually every industry and convenience of life in America relied on wood, America’s professional foresters and others saw fire as a waste of valuable forest resources. Public support for fire suppression increased after a series of large, intense fires burned vast stretches of U.S. wildlands, destroyed entire communities, and led to the loss of many lives. A tipping point came in 1910, when a wave of wildfires swept across the West, burning more than 3 million acres and leading to the loss of 78 firefighters.
In the years following the 1910 fires, Federal and State agencies strove to suppress all wildfires, but the lack of fire led to changes in the condition of some fire-dependent wildlands, and a build-up of flammable materials. Since the early 1900s, public wildfire management policy has evolved considerably. In the 1960s and 1970s, managers, scientists, and the public learned more about the fundamental role in many forest and wildland ecosystems. Fire has been gradually reintroduced through carefully controlled burns referred to as prescribed burning.
Public wildfire policy continues to evolve, as managers advance their efforts to coordinate and improve wildfire response, prevention, and restoration of fire-adapted wildlands. Much work still remains to reduce fuels to those more closely matching the ecological fire loads of natural fire regimes, especially because biomass continues to accumulate.


Similar Titles:
Management, Drop Your Tools: Military Metaphors for Wildland Firefighting and Public Resistance to “Safety” Legacies of Tragedy Fires

Environmental history (1855-2011) of wildland fire and fuels management across Forest Service and tribal ownerships of the eastside Cascades of Oregon


 
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