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Canadian Arab High School Students’ Perceptions of Their Schooling Experiences- A Narrative Analysis

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Abstract:

Canadian Arab High School Students’ Perceptions of Their Schooling Experiences- A Narrative Analysis


Doctoral Research Abstract


University of Windsor




























Nesreen ELkord
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
elkord@uwindsor.ca


Objectives
The purpose of the research study is to reach an understanding of Canadian Arab youth perceptions of their schooling experiences.
My work is aligned with Parelius’s (1982) view that “Educating any ethnically, socially, or economically different group of students is a matter of finding the social means of providing educational equity for students with diverse functional characteristics, and not a matter of compensation for some kind of handicap” (p. 166). Hence, a primary objective of my research is not to suggest how Arab immigrant youth can be taught to fit into existing socio-educational systems, but, rather, to help in determining how certain aspects of the Canadian educational system can be modified to include them. Indeed, in my research I shed light on the educational experiences of my student participants in hope of understanding the circumstances, events or conflicts they face from their own perspectives, so that better strategies can be identified to address these challenges.
Conceptual framework
I am leading a narrative inquiry into the lived experiences of my student participants. In narrative analysis stories are analyzed within three contexts, the social, cultural and historical contexts within which they are told based on the work of Clandinin and Connelly (2000). Representing and analyzing someone else’s voice needs to be done with respect. I therefore, use a social constructionist approach in analyzing the stories my participants tell in order for them to be viewed as changing and evolving narratives that aim at making meaningful educating research.

Methods/Research design
The two main research methods utilized are individual interviews and in school observation. I observe Canadian Arab students in their high schools, for one semester before I invite them to voluntarily participate in semi-structured individual interviews. I select 8-10 students using homogeneous sampling strategy based on the criteria of being new comer Arab immigrants and being enrolled in any of grades 9, 10, 11 or 12 in any of the public/Catholic high schools in the city of Windsor, Ontario. I consider Windsor, an appropriate place for my study because it is home for a significantly large Arabic community, which represented 8.15% of the city’s population in 2006 (Citizenship and Immigration Canada, 2010).
The study incorporates interviews with student participants as well as secondary participants like parents, teachers and peers. I also use field notes from observing to help better understand the lived experiences of my student participants through their voices and my researcher eye.

Results/Discussion/Significance of study
I situate my research in the field of immigrants’ education, which is significant given the changing demographic composition of Canada’s public/Catholic school populations. I seek to illuminate the margins of society through learning more about the experiences of those who face unique experiences throughout their educational journeys. Practically, I aim at helping schools and related stakeholders to better understand and therefore be able to support Arab immigrant youths’ needs, thus enabling them to succeed both academically as well as in other areas of their lives, through a clear representation of Arab students. This study could also assist Arab youth and their parents in understanding the journey and preparing for succeeding throughout the process. I hope that it will help improve pedagogical practices and societal relations through its dissemination of information to teachers and policy makers.
This research, amongst others, are baby steps in the long process of the development and implementations of “Education for all”.




References:

Citizensip and Immigration Canada. (2010). Facts and figures 2009: Immigration overview—Permanent and temporary residents. Retrieved from http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/statistics/facts2009/permanent/01.asp
Clandinin, D. J., & Connelly, F. M. (2000). Narrative inquiry: Experience and story in
qualitative research. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Parelius, A. P. (1982). Equity in education [Review of the book A sociology of education: Access
to power and privilege, by M. A. Chesler & W. M. Cave]. Contemporary sociology, 11(2),
166-167.
Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2067015
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Association:
Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706487_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Elkord, Nesreen. "Canadian Arab High School Students’ Perceptions of Their Schooling Experiences- A Narrative Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706487_index.html>

APA Citation:

Elkord, N. , 2014-03-10 "Canadian Arab High School Students’ Perceptions of Their Schooling Experiences- A Narrative Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706487_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Canadian Arab High School Students’ Perceptions of Their Schooling Experiences- A Narrative Analysis


Doctoral Research Abstract


University of Windsor




























Nesreen ELkord
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
elkord@uwindsor.ca


Objectives
The purpose of the research study is to reach an understanding of Canadian Arab youth perceptions of their schooling experiences.
My work is aligned with Parelius’s (1982) view that “Educating any ethnically, socially, or economically different group of students is a matter of finding the social means of providing educational equity for students with diverse functional characteristics, and not a matter of compensation for some kind of handicap” (p. 166). Hence, a primary objective of my research is not to suggest how Arab immigrant youth can be taught to fit into existing socio-educational systems, but, rather, to help in determining how certain aspects of the Canadian educational system can be modified to include them. Indeed, in my research I shed light on the educational experiences of my student participants in hope of understanding the circumstances, events or conflicts they face from their own perspectives, so that better strategies can be identified to address these challenges.
Conceptual framework
I am leading a narrative inquiry into the lived experiences of my student participants. In narrative analysis stories are analyzed within three contexts, the social, cultural and historical contexts within which they are told based on the work of Clandinin and Connelly (2000). Representing and analyzing someone else’s voice needs to be done with respect. I therefore, use a social constructionist approach in analyzing the stories my participants tell in order for them to be viewed as changing and evolving narratives that aim at making meaningful educating research.

Methods/Research design
The two main research methods utilized are individual interviews and in school observation. I observe Canadian Arab students in their high schools, for one semester before I invite them to voluntarily participate in semi-structured individual interviews. I select 8-10 students using homogeneous sampling strategy based on the criteria of being new comer Arab immigrants and being enrolled in any of grades 9, 10, 11 or 12 in any of the public/Catholic high schools in the city of Windsor, Ontario. I consider Windsor, an appropriate place for my study because it is home for a significantly large Arabic community, which represented 8.15% of the city’s population in 2006 (Citizenship and Immigration Canada, 2010).
The study incorporates interviews with student participants as well as secondary participants like parents, teachers and peers. I also use field notes from observing to help better understand the lived experiences of my student participants through their voices and my researcher eye.

Results/Discussion/Significance of study
I situate my research in the field of immigrants’ education, which is significant given the changing demographic composition of Canada’s public/Catholic school populations. I seek to illuminate the margins of society through learning more about the experiences of those who face unique experiences throughout their educational journeys. Practically, I aim at helping schools and related stakeholders to better understand and therefore be able to support Arab immigrant youths’ needs, thus enabling them to succeed both academically as well as in other areas of their lives, through a clear representation of Arab students. This study could also assist Arab youth and their parents in understanding the journey and preparing for succeeding throughout the process. I hope that it will help improve pedagogical practices and societal relations through its dissemination of information to teachers and policy makers.
This research, amongst others, are baby steps in the long process of the development and implementations of “Education for all”.




References:

Citizensip and Immigration Canada. (2010). Facts and figures 2009: Immigration overview—Permanent and temporary residents. Retrieved from http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/statistics/facts2009/permanent/01.asp
Clandinin, D. J., & Connelly, F. M. (2000). Narrative inquiry: Experience and story in
qualitative research. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Parelius, A. P. (1982). Equity in education [Review of the book A sociology of education: Access
to power and privilege, by M. A. Chesler & W. M. Cave]. Contemporary sociology, 11(2),
166-167.
Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2067015


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