Citation

Impact of forced land evictions on women in Cambodia

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

1.Objectives

The objective of this study was to qualitatively examine the psychosocial implications of land evictions and the threat of land evictions on 40 women in Cambodia to gain a holistic understanding of the impacts of land evictions on women by examining their mental, psychological, and emotional wellbeing as a result of the eviction process and land grabs.

2. Theoretical/conceptual framework

Land is one of the most valuable sources of wealth for any society. With land comes the inherent ability to produce capital by means of development. Land provides a place to build a home and sustain agricultural livelihood. Land ownership provides a sense of security and offers a sense of belonging. Thus land ownership allows for financial, mental, and social security for one’s self and one’s family. Legislation regarding titling however is often flawed in many less developed countries and is a key legal barrier to obtaining official ownership. Since land ownership can often be based on a system of wealth, poorer members of society often lack the resources needed to obtain land titles, leaving them at higher risk of suffering from displacement and inability to sustain a living.

The value that land ownership differs for men and women. For instance, where men may view the ownership of land as a source of wealth and power, women in less developed counties view land ownership as a means for protection and shelter. Gender discrimination regarding ownership of land creates additional barriers for women. With a majority of property laws favoring men, access to land rights can provide women a sense of insecurity when, for instance, faced with death or abandonment of their partner. Research suggests that the independence and security of women relies heavily on housing. Women, as a result of their traditional family duties in the house, experience unique impacts as a result of forced land evictions.

3.Methods

A 37 question semi-structured protocol was developed for this study. The protocol was divided into five sections: eviction status, demographics, psychological/emotional impacts, economic impacts, and mental health supports available. The questions were developed by a team of multi-disciplinary professionals from SKO, all with experience working with female victims of trauma.

Questions about the mental health indicators were based on psychological and emotional symptoms described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as well as other indicators noted in the Hopkins-25 Checklist for assessing anxiety and depression. The research team selected questions from these resources that best informed the research questions.

4.Data

Sampling was done using a mix of convenience sampling based on previous relationships and snowball sampling based on our extensive network of grassroots organizations. Snowball sampling was necessary for this study was used to find and recruit hard to locate participants. We used links to local women’s rights organizations, individual victims of forced land evictions, and activists to locate these participants. The researchers interviewed 10 women in each of the four locations achieving a total of 40 interviews. After conducting interviews in each commune, the researchers conducted a focus group. The focus groups were used to gain a consensus around potential solutions to land grabbing.

5.Results

Stages of land eviction were created by the researchers based on our extensive experience working with women who have experienced or who are experiencing economic land concessions. 30 of the women interviewed had lost farmland, 5 had lost residential land, and 5 were classified as vulnerable. Three of those vulnerable had a land certificate but feared their land or house would be seized, whereas two of the vulnerable had their valuables destroyed when workers flooded their houses with sand.

The most prevalent mental and emotional symptoms were sadness (n=40), worrying (n=40), difficulty sleeping (n=39), difficulty concentrating (n=38), lethargy (n=38), emotional outbursts (n=36), frequent negative thoughts and memories (n=34), and a preoccupation with the safety of the family (n=34).Other behaviors included the use of self-prescribed medication (n=13).

6.Significance

No women from our study received or sought counseling or therapy services. Ensuring that appropriate therapeutic support groups and mental health services are provided to women victims of land evictions can positively impact the way they treat their families and raise their children. The strong mental health of women facing land evictions will promote stability and hope for the future generations.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706670_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Richardson, Jayson. and Nash, John. "Impact of forced land evictions on women in Cambodia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706670_index.html>

APA Citation:

Richardson, J. W. and Nash, J. , 2014-03-10 "Impact of forced land evictions on women in Cambodia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706670_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: 1.Objectives

The objective of this study was to qualitatively examine the psychosocial implications of land evictions and the threat of land evictions on 40 women in Cambodia to gain a holistic understanding of the impacts of land evictions on women by examining their mental, psychological, and emotional wellbeing as a result of the eviction process and land grabs.

2. Theoretical/conceptual framework

Land is one of the most valuable sources of wealth for any society. With land comes the inherent ability to produce capital by means of development. Land provides a place to build a home and sustain agricultural livelihood. Land ownership provides a sense of security and offers a sense of belonging. Thus land ownership allows for financial, mental, and social security for one’s self and one’s family. Legislation regarding titling however is often flawed in many less developed countries and is a key legal barrier to obtaining official ownership. Since land ownership can often be based on a system of wealth, poorer members of society often lack the resources needed to obtain land titles, leaving them at higher risk of suffering from displacement and inability to sustain a living.

The value that land ownership differs for men and women. For instance, where men may view the ownership of land as a source of wealth and power, women in less developed counties view land ownership as a means for protection and shelter. Gender discrimination regarding ownership of land creates additional barriers for women. With a majority of property laws favoring men, access to land rights can provide women a sense of insecurity when, for instance, faced with death or abandonment of their partner. Research suggests that the independence and security of women relies heavily on housing. Women, as a result of their traditional family duties in the house, experience unique impacts as a result of forced land evictions.

3.Methods

A 37 question semi-structured protocol was developed for this study. The protocol was divided into five sections: eviction status, demographics, psychological/emotional impacts, economic impacts, and mental health supports available. The questions were developed by a team of multi-disciplinary professionals from SKO, all with experience working with female victims of trauma.

Questions about the mental health indicators were based on psychological and emotional symptoms described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as well as other indicators noted in the Hopkins-25 Checklist for assessing anxiety and depression. The research team selected questions from these resources that best informed the research questions.

4.Data

Sampling was done using a mix of convenience sampling based on previous relationships and snowball sampling based on our extensive network of grassroots organizations. Snowball sampling was necessary for this study was used to find and recruit hard to locate participants. We used links to local women’s rights organizations, individual victims of forced land evictions, and activists to locate these participants. The researchers interviewed 10 women in each of the four locations achieving a total of 40 interviews. After conducting interviews in each commune, the researchers conducted a focus group. The focus groups were used to gain a consensus around potential solutions to land grabbing.

5.Results

Stages of land eviction were created by the researchers based on our extensive experience working with women who have experienced or who are experiencing economic land concessions. 30 of the women interviewed had lost farmland, 5 had lost residential land, and 5 were classified as vulnerable. Three of those vulnerable had a land certificate but feared their land or house would be seized, whereas two of the vulnerable had their valuables destroyed when workers flooded their houses with sand.

The most prevalent mental and emotional symptoms were sadness (n=40), worrying (n=40), difficulty sleeping (n=39), difficulty concentrating (n=38), lethargy (n=38), emotional outbursts (n=36), frequent negative thoughts and memories (n=34), and a preoccupation with the safety of the family (n=34).Other behaviors included the use of self-prescribed medication (n=13).

6.Significance

No women from our study received or sought counseling or therapy services. Ensuring that appropriate therapeutic support groups and mental health services are provided to women victims of land evictions can positively impact the way they treat their families and raise their children. The strong mental health of women facing land evictions will promote stability and hope for the future generations.


Similar Titles:
Mexican American Women in the Labor Force: Impacts of Regional Concentration

This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land: The Ethical Juxtaposition of Land Grabbing and Its Violent Effects on Women and Children in Africa

Race, Marriage and Women's Employment Patterns: The Impact of Marriage on Labor Force Entry and Exit and Implications for Poverty and Welfare


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.