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Being a comparativist in the Soviet Union: Considering contexts, careers, and colleagues

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Abstract:

From the mid-1950s until her death in 2003, Zoya Malkova, the first chair of the Scientific Council of Comparative Pedagogics of the USSR, (admitted to WCCES in 1989) (Borevskaya, 2007), studied US education; met with US educators such as Gerald Read and George Bereday; travelled to the US for speaking engagements, research, and, in the post-Soviet period, teaching; and published regularly, in both Soviet (later Russian) and western journals. Her work was mentioned by western comparativists such as Brian Holmes and included in a 1969 collection of essays of non-US views of US education. What accounts for her ability to sustain her career during times of political change in the Soviet Union, and simultaneously to be taken seriously as a scholar by colleagues in the west? An analysis of her letters to and from Gerald Read (CIES archives), a number of her articles and those of scholars who cite her, plus newspaper reports on her US visits, suggests that she was an adroit reader of the audience she was writing for and could adjust her rhetoric accordingly. In addition, she employed other strategies: the use of contemporary Soviet slogans or appropriate references to “bourgeois falsifications” when writing for an internal audience; quoting domestic critics of US education in articles published internationally; and criticizing scholars whom she did not know rather than her friends (for example, excoriating Bill Brickman, but not Read or Bereday, for the portrait of Soviet Schools in their 1960 book, The Changing Soviet School).
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Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706909_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Merrill, Martha. "Being a comparativist in the Soviet Union: Considering contexts, careers, and colleagues" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706909_index.html>

APA Citation:

Merrill, M. C. "Being a comparativist in the Soviet Union: Considering contexts, careers, and colleagues" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706909_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: From the mid-1950s until her death in 2003, Zoya Malkova, the first chair of the Scientific Council of Comparative Pedagogics of the USSR, (admitted to WCCES in 1989) (Borevskaya, 2007), studied US education; met with US educators such as Gerald Read and George Bereday; travelled to the US for speaking engagements, research, and, in the post-Soviet period, teaching; and published regularly, in both Soviet (later Russian) and western journals. Her work was mentioned by western comparativists such as Brian Holmes and included in a 1969 collection of essays of non-US views of US education. What accounts for her ability to sustain her career during times of political change in the Soviet Union, and simultaneously to be taken seriously as a scholar by colleagues in the west? An analysis of her letters to and from Gerald Read (CIES archives), a number of her articles and those of scholars who cite her, plus newspaper reports on her US visits, suggests that she was an adroit reader of the audience she was writing for and could adjust her rhetoric accordingly. In addition, she employed other strategies: the use of contemporary Soviet slogans or appropriate references to “bourgeois falsifications” when writing for an internal audience; quoting domestic critics of US education in articles published internationally; and criticizing scholars whom she did not know rather than her friends (for example, excoriating Bill Brickman, but not Read or Bereday, for the portrait of Soviet Schools in their 1960 book, The Changing Soviet School).


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