Citation

The Geography of Crime and Justice: Explaining Spatial Shifts in Crime Across Oregon from 1990 to 2010

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Abstract:

Crime patterns are not stationary and have shifted related to ecological, social, and political forces. These forces are also emerging, dissipating, and shifting over time. The empirical study of the geography of crime patterns dates back well over 200 years. Unfortunately datasets allowing for the testing of the forces affecting crime and arrest patterns over long time periods are currently very limited. Social Disorganization Theory suggests that spatial crime patterns are at least partially related to social ecological factors. This project analyzed the ecological causes of crime using a multi-level multi-year dataset suitable for spatial regression modeling of agency-level arrest data from 1990 to 2010 in the state of Oregon. The analysis addresses a series of questions surrounding crime, arrests, and space. The findings suggests that ecological determinates of crime predicted by social disorganization theory are impacting crime patterns in Oregon. The results suggest that measures of social and economic inequality are more powerful predictors of arrest patterns than measures of crime.
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Association:
Name: Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.pacificsoc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707397_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Harmon, Mark., Hosack, Bryan. and Kwak, Dae-Hoon. "The Geography of Crime and Justice: Explaining Spatial Shifts in Crime Across Oregon from 1990 to 2010" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707397_index.html>

APA Citation:

Harmon, M. G., Hosack, B. and Kwak, D. , 2014-03-27 "The Geography of Crime and Justice: Explaining Spatial Shifts in Crime Across Oregon from 1990 to 2010" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707397_index.html

Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Crime patterns are not stationary and have shifted related to ecological, social, and political forces. These forces are also emerging, dissipating, and shifting over time. The empirical study of the geography of crime patterns dates back well over 200 years. Unfortunately datasets allowing for the testing of the forces affecting crime and arrest patterns over long time periods are currently very limited. Social Disorganization Theory suggests that spatial crime patterns are at least partially related to social ecological factors. This project analyzed the ecological causes of crime using a multi-level multi-year dataset suitable for spatial regression modeling of agency-level arrest data from 1990 to 2010 in the state of Oregon. The analysis addresses a series of questions surrounding crime, arrests, and space. The findings suggests that ecological determinates of crime predicted by social disorganization theory are impacting crime patterns in Oregon. The results suggest that measures of social and economic inequality are more powerful predictors of arrest patterns than measures of crime.


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Explaining Spatial-Temporal Concentrations of Crime Events in the Urban Area by the Space and Time Convergence of Crime Prone People and Criminogenic Settings

Exploring and Explaining the Immigration-Crime Nexus Across Time: A Longitudinal, City-Level Analysis.

Comparing Perceptions of Justice, Crime and Discrimination across Europe and the US


 
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